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Why should support schemes for renewable electricity complement the EU emissions trading scheme?

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  • Lehmann, Paul
  • Gawel, Erik

Abstract

In virtually all EU Member States, the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) is complemented by support schemes for electricity generation from renewable energy sources (RES-E). This policy mix has been subject to strong criticism. It is mainly argued that RES-E schemes contribute nothing to emissions reduction and undermine the cost-effectiveness of the EU ETS. Consequently, many scholars suggest the abolition of RES-E schemes. However, this conclusion rests on quite narrow and unrealistic assumptions about the design and performance of markets and policies. This article provides a systematic and comprehensive review and discussion of possible rationales for combining the EU ETS with RES-E support schemes. The first and most important reason may be restrictions to technology development and adoption. These may be attributed to the failure of markets as well as policies, and more generally to the path dependency in socio-technical systems. Under these conditions, RES-E schemes are required to reach sufficient levels of technology development. In addition, it is highlighted that in contrast to the EU ETS RES-E support schemes may provide benefits beyond mitigating climate change. --

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Division of Social Sciences (ÖKUS) in its series UFZ Discussion Papers with number 5/2011.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:ufzdps:52011

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Keywords: EU Emissions Trading System; market failure; path dependency; policy failure; policy mix; renewable energies; subsidies;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Gawel, Erik & Strunz, Sebastian & Lehmann, Paul, 2013. "A public choice view on the climate and energy policy mix in the EU: How do the emissions trading scheme and support for renewable energies interact?," UFZ Discussion Papers 5/2013, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Division of Social Sciences (ÖKUS).
  2. Thema, Johannes & Suerkemper, Felix & Grave, Katharina & Amelung, Adrian, 2013. "The impact of electricity demand reduction policies on the EU-ETS: Modelling electricity and carbon prices and the effect on industrial competitiveness," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 656-666.
  3. Purkus, Alexandra & Gawel, Erik & Thrän, Daniela, 2012. "Bioenergy governance between market and government failures: A new institutional economics perspective," UFZ Discussion Papers 13/2012, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Division of Social Sciences (ÖKUS).
  4. Gawel, Erik & Strunz, Sebastian & Lehmann, Paul, 2012. "The German Energiewende under attack: Is there an irrational Sonderweg?," UFZ Discussion Papers 15/2012, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Division of Social Sciences (ÖKUS).
  5. Felix Groba & Barbara Breitschopf, 2013. "Impact of Renewable Energy Policy and Use on Innovation: A Literature Review," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1318, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  6. repec:hal:wpaper:hal-00866408 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Lehmann, Paul, 2013. "Supplementing an emissions tax by a feed-in tariff for renewable electricity to address learning spillovers," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 635-641.
  8. Paul Lehmann & Felix Creutzig & Melf-Hinrich Ehlers & Nele Friedrichsen & Clemens Heuson & Lion Hirth & Robert Pietzcker, 2012. "Carbon Lock-Out: Advancing Renewable Energy Policy in Europe," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(2), pages 323-354, February.
  9. Brigitte Knopf & Bjørn Bakken & Samuel Carrara & Amit Kanudia & Ilkka Keppo & Tiina Koljonen & Silvana Mima & Eva Schmid & Detlef P. Van Vuuren, 2013. "Transforming The European Energy System: Member States' Prospects Within The Eu Framework," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 4(su), pages 1340005-1-1.
  10. Manuel Frondel & Christoph M. Schmidt & Colin Vance, 2014. "„Grüner“ Strom gleich guter Strom? Warum Solarförderung ein teurer Irrtum ist," RWI Positionen, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, pages 19, 04.
  11. Gawel, Erik & Strunz, Sebastian & Lehmann, Paul, 2013. "Polit-ökonomische Grenzen des Emissionshandels und ihre Implikationen für die klima- und energiepolitische Instrumentenwahl," UFZ Discussion Papers 2/2013, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Division of Social Sciences (ÖKUS).
  12. Manuel Frondel & Christoph M. Schmidt & Colin Vance, 2012. "Germany’s Solar Cell Promotion: An Unfolding Disaster," Ruhr Economic Papers 0353, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.

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