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"Steeping" Of Health Expenditure Profiles

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  • Buchner, Florian
  • Wasem, Jürgen

Abstract

If health care expenditure for the elderly grows faster than for younger people, the expenditure profiles become "steeper" – we call that "steeping". Three instruments for measuring "steeping" are presented: (1) trend of the relation between per-capita-expenditure of the old and the young; (2) comparing the linear slopes of per-capita-expenditure in age groups; (3) trend in parameters of non-linear modelling of expenditure profiles. Using data of the largest German private health insurer over a period of 18 years, "steeping" could be observed by all three methods in most examined insurance plans. A prognosis for 2040 shows that per-capita-expenditure will increase by 128 %. --

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Duisburg-Essen, Faculty for Economics and Business Administration in its series IBES Diskussionsbeiträge with number 139.

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Date of creation: 2004
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:udewwd:139

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Keywords: health care expenditure; expenditure profiles; demographics;

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Cited by:
  1. Laurence J. Kotlikoff & Christian Hagist, 2005. "Who’s Going Broke? Comparing Growth in Healthcare Costs in Ten OECD Countries," Working Papers id:286, eSocialSciences.
  2. Ried, Walter, 2007. "On the relationship between aging, edical progress and age-specific health care expenditures," Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Diskussionspapiere 08/2007, Ernst Moritz Arndt University of Greifswald, Faculty of Law and Economics.
  3. Gregersen, Fredrik Alexander & Godager, Geir, 2013. "Hospital expenditures and the red herring hypothesis: Evidence from a complete national registry," HERO On line Working Paper Series 2013:3, Oslo University, Health Economics Research Programme.
  4. Felder, Stefan & Werblow, Andreas, 2008. "Do the age profiles of health care expenditure really steepen over time? New evidence from Swiss cantons," Dresden Discussion Paper Series in Economics 05/08, Dresden University of Technology, Faculty of Business and Economics, Department of Economics.
  5. Christian Hagist & Laurence J. Kotlikoff, 2009. "Who’s going broke? Comparing growth in Public healthcare expenditure in Ten OECD Countries," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 188(1), pages 55-72, March.

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