Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

What do people know about the economy? A test of minimal economic knowledge in Germany

Contents:

Author Info

  • Wobker, Inga
  • Lehmann-Waffenschmidt, Marco
  • Kenning, Peter
  • Gigerenzer, Gerd
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This research evaluates Minimal Economic Knowledge (MEK) in Germany - that is, basic knowledge of economic facts, concepts, and causal relationships needed for understanding and successfully participating in the economy. It is addressed to gain an understanding of the level of Minimal Economic Knowledge in the German public. To fulfill this goal we conducted three studies: The first study developed a scale for measuring MEK using a Delphi method approach. The resulting questionnaire comprises 24 questions in four economic domains: finance, labor economics, consumption, and state economics, testing for three kinds of knowledge within each domain - facts, concepts, and causal relationships. Our second study tested the MEK level in a representative sample of German adults (N=1,314), with a mean result of 59.4 (of 100) indicating a considerable lack of economic knowledge. It further analyses the influence of demographic drivers such as gender and age. A third, explorative study (N=243) determined additional drivers for MEK such as a person's origin, life experience, use of media, and social circumstance. --

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/67721/1/732597579.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Dresden University of Technology, Faculty of Business and Economics, Department of Economics in its series Dresden Discussion Paper Series in Economics with number 03/12.

    as in new window
    Length:
    Date of creation: 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:zbw:tuddps:0312

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: 01062 Dresden
    Phone: ++49 351 463 2196
    Fax: ++49 351 463 7739
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.tu-dresden.de/wiwi/
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords: economic literacy; drivers; education; laypersons; minimal economic knowledge;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Lechner, Michael & Miquel, Ruth & Wunsch, Conny, 2005. "The curse and blessing of training the unemployed in a changing economy : the case of East Germany after unification," IAB Discussion Paper 200514, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    2. Caplan, Bryan, 2001. "What Makes People Think Like Economists? Evidence on Economic Cognition from the "Survey of Americans and Economists on the Economy."," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 44(2), pages 395-426, October.
    3. Dohmen Thomas & Falk Armin & Huffman David & Sunde Uwe, 2009. "Are Risk Aversion and Impatience Related to Cognitive Ability?," Research Memorandum 040, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
    4. Walstad, William B & Soper, John C, 1988. "A Report Card on the Economic Literacy of U.S. High School Students," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(2), pages 251-56, May.
    5. Jappelli, Tullio, 2010. "Economic literacy: An international comparison," CFS Working Paper Series 2010/16, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    6. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2011. "Financial Literacy Around the World: An Overview," CeRP Working Papers 106, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).
    7. Bryan Caplan, 2002. "Systematically Biased Beliefs About Economics: Robust Evidence of Judgemental Anomalies from the Survey of Americans and Economists on the Economy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(479), pages 433-458, April.
    8. Dimitrios Christelis & Tullio Jappelli & Mario Padula, 2006. "Cognitive Abilities and Portfolio Choice," CSEF Working Papers 157, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    9. Boltho, Andrea & Carlin, Wendy & Scaramozzino, Pasquale, 1997. "Will East Germany Become a New Mezzogiorno?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 241-264, June.
    10. Bucher-Koenen, Tabea & Lusardi, Annamaria, 2011. "Financial literacy and retirement planning in Germany," MEA discussion paper series 11239, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
    11. Tabea Bucher-Koenen & Annamaria Lusardi, 2011. "Financial Literacy and Retirement Planning in Germany," NBER Working Papers 17110, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Robert J. Blendon, 1997. "Bridging the Gap between the Public's and Economists' Views of the Economy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(3), pages 105-118, Summer.
    13. Chen, Haiyang & Volpe, Ronald P., 1998. "An Analysis of Personal Financial Literacy Among College Students," Financial Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 107-128.
    14. William B. Walstad, 1997. "The Effect of Economic Knowledge on Public Opinion of Economic Issues," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(3), pages 195-205, January.
    15. Lucia A. Reisch, 2004. "Principles and Visions of a New Consumer Policy: Discussion Paper by the Scientific Advisory Board for Consumer, Food, and Nutrition Policy to the German Federal Ministry of Consumer Protection, Food,," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 1-42, 03.
    16. Sam Allgood & William B. Walstad, 1999. "What Do College Seniors Know about Economics?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 350-354, May.
    17. Walstad, William B. & Rebeck, Ken, 2002. "Assessing the economic knowledge and economic opinions of adults," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 921-935.
    18. Welsh, Arthur L & Fels, Rendigs, 1969. "Performance on the New Test of Understanding in College Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 59(2), pages 224-29, May.
    19. Williamson, Maureen R. & Wearing, Alexander J., 1996. "Lay people's cognitive models of the economy," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 3-38, February.
    20. Bucher-Koenen, Tabea & Lusardi, Annamaria, 2011. "Financial literacy and retirement planning in Germany," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(04), pages 565-584, October.
    21. Eric A. Hanushek, 2005. "The Economics of School Quality," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 6(3), pages 269-286, 08.
    22. Tabea Bucher-Koenen & Annamaria Lusardi, 2011. "Financial Literacy and Retirement Planning in Germany," CeRP Working Papers 109, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:tuddps:0312. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - German National Library of Economics).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.