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Fiscal Multipliers and the Labour Market in the Open Economy

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  • Merkl, Christian
  • Faia, Ester
  • Lechthaler, Wolfgang

Abstract

Several contributions have recently assessed the size of fiscal multipliers both in RBC models and New Keynesian models. None of the studies considers a model with frictional labour markets which is a crucial element, particularly at times in which much of the fiscal stimulus has been directed toward labour market measures. We use an open economy model (more specifically a currency area calibrated on the EMU) with labour market frictions in the form of labour turnover costs and workers' heterogeneity to measure fiscal multipliers. We compute short and long run multipliers and open economy spillovers for five types of fiscal packages: pure demand stimuli and consumption tax cuts return very small multipliers; income tax cut and hiring subsidies deliver larger multipliers as they reduce distortions in sclerotic labour markets; short-time work (German Kurzarbeit) returns negative short-run multipliers, but stabilises employment. Our model highlights a novel dimension through which multipliers operate, namely the labour demand stimulus which occurs in a model with non-walrasian labour markets. --

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW) in its series Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy with number 37509.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwkie:37509

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Keywords: fiscal multipliers; fiscal packages; labour market frictions;

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References

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  1. Jordi Gali & David López-Salido & Javier Valles, 2004. "Understanding the effects of government spending on consumption," International Finance Discussion Papers 805, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  2. Wolfgang Lechthaler & Christian Merkl & Ester Faia, 2009. "Labor Turnover Costs, Workers’ Heterogeneity and Optimal Monetary Policy," 2009 Meeting Papers 193, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  3. John F. Cogan & Tobias Cwik & John B. Taylor & Volker Wieland, 2009. "New Keynesian versus Old Keynesian Government Spending Multipliers," NBER Working Papers 14782, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Lechthaler, Wolfgang & Merkl, Christian & Snower, Dennis J., 2010. "Monetary Persistence and the Labor Market: A New Perspective," CEPR Discussion Papers 7650, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe & Martin Uribe, 2001. "Closing Small Open Economy Models," Departmental Working Papers 200115, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
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  18. Ralf A. Wilke, 2005. "New Extimates of the Duration and Risk of Unemployment for West-Germany," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 125(2), pages 207-237.
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Cited by:
  1. Charl Jooste, Guangling (Dave) Liu and Ruthira Naraidoo, 2013. "Analysing the Effects of Fiscal Policy Shocks in the South African Economy," Working Papers 351, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  2. Roland Winkler & Alexander Totzek, 2011. "Fiscal Stimulus in a Business Cycle Model with Firm Entry," 2011 Meeting Papers 140, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  3. Cristiano Cantore & Paul Levine & Giovanni Melina & Bo Yang, 2012. "A Fiscal Stimulus with Deep Habits and Optimal Monetary Policy," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0512, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  4. Totzek, Alexander & Winkler, Roland C., 2010. "Fiscal stimulus in a model with endogenous firm entry," Economics Working Papers 2010,05, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Economics.
  5. Cristiano Cantore & Paul Levine & Giovanni Melina, 2011. "A Fiscal Stimulus and Jobless Recovery," School of Economics Discussion Papers 1111, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  6. Ekkehard Ernst & Uma Rani, 2011. "Understanding unemployment flows," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(2), pages 268-294.
  7. Alessia Campolmi & Ester Faia & Roland Winkler, 2011. "Fiscal Calculus in a New Keynesian Model with Labor Market Frictions," MNB Working Papers 2011/5, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (the central bank of Hungary).
  8. Alessia Campolmi & Ester Faia & Roland Winkler, 2010. "Fiscal Calculus in a New Keynesian Model with Matching Frictions," Kiel Working Papers 1602, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  9. Dieter Hundt & Frank-Jürgen Weise & Hagen Lesch & Wolfgang Lechthaler & Christian Merkl, 2012. "Eurokrise, Energiewende, Konjunkturabkühlung: Ende des deutschen Jobwunders?," Ifo Schnelldienst, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 65(01), pages 03-13, 01.

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