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Changing Perceptions of Maturity Mismatch in the US Banking System: Evidence from Equity Markets

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Author Info

  • Andrew T. Young

    (Department of Economics, West Virginia University)

  • Travis Wiseman

    (Department of Economics, West Virginia University)

  • Thomas L. Hogan

    (Department of Economics, George Mason University)

Abstract

US banks are thought to have become increasingly fragile and exposed during the lead-up to the recent financial crisis. However, commercial bank leverage actually decreased during this period. To resolve this discrepancy, we explore another dimension of bank balance sheets: the effective maturity mismatch between assets and liabilities. Although banks assets are generally longer in term than their liabilities, we find evidence of a structural break in the mid-1990s when equity markets begin pricing banks as relatively longer-funded. Categories of bank assets such as real estate loans (i.e., mortgages and MBSs) and consumer loans were perceived as having become effectively shorter-term.

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File URL: http://www.be.wvu.edu/phd_economics/pdf/10-04.pdf
File Function: First version, 2010
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, West Virginia University in its series Working Papers with number 10-04.

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Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wvu:wpaper:10-04

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Keywords: maturity mismatch; effective maturity; commercial banks; GSEs; Fannie and Freddie;

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  1. W. Scott Frame & Lawrence J. White, 2004. "Fussing and fuming over Fannie and Freddie: how much smoke, how much fire?," Working Paper 2004-26, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  2. Mark Flannery & Christopher James, . "Market Evidence on the Effective Maturity of Bank Assets and Liabilities," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 05-83, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
  3. Roberto Chang & Andres Velasco, 1998. "Financial Crises in Emerging Markets," NBER Working Papers 6606, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Douglas W. Diamond & Philip H. Dybvig, 2000. "Bank runs, deposit insurance, and liquidity," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 14-23.
  5. Bleakley, Hoyt & Cowan, Kevin, 2010. "Maturity mismatch and financial crises: Evidence from emerging market corporations," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(2), pages 189-205, November.
  6. Roberto Chang & Andres Velasco, 1998. "Financial crises in emerging markets: a canonical model," Working Paper 98-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  7. Douglas W. Diamond & Raghuram G. Rajan, 2009. "Illiquidity and Interest Rate Policy," NBER Working Papers 15197, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Andrei Shleifer ad Robert W. Vishny, 1995. "The Limits of Arbitrage," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1725, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  9. Douglas W. Diamond & Raghuram Rajan, 2009. "The Credit Crisis: Conjectures about Causes and Remedies," NBER Working Papers 14739, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Brent W. Ambrose & Tao-Hsien Dolly King, 2002. "GSE debt and the decline in the Treasury debt market," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 812-847.
  11. M.A. Grove, 1974. "On "Duration" and the Optimal Maturity Structure of the Balance Sheet," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 5(2), pages 696-709, Autumn.
  12. Bencivenga, V.R. & Smith, B.D., 1988. "Financial Intermediation And Endogenous Growth," RCER Working Papers 124, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  13. Tobias Adrian & Hyun Song Shin, 2009. "Money, Liquidity, and Monetary Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 600-605, May.
  14. Rajan ( , Ramkishen S. & Bird, Graham, 2003. "Banks, Maturity Mismatches and Liquidity Crises: A Simple Model," Economia Internazionale / International Economics, Camera di Commercio di Genova, vol. 56(2), pages 185-192.
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Cited by:
  1. Camille Cornand & Céline Gimet, 2011. "The 2007-2008 financial crisis : Is there evidence of disaster myopia ?," Working Papers 1125, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique (GATE), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Université Lyon 2, Ecole Normale Supérieure.
  2. Camille Cornand & Céline Gimet, 2012. "The 2007-2008 financial crisis: Is there evidence of disaster myopia?," Post-Print halshs-00617127, HAL.

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