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Part-time Work, School Success and School Leaving

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Author Info

  • Christian Dustmann

    (University College London)

  • Najma Rajah

    (Institute of Fiscsl Studies)

  • Athur van Soest

    (Tilburg University)

Abstract

This paper analyses the labour supply decisions of a cohort of 16 year-olds who were born in 1958 in England and Wales. It traces through the effects of part-time employment by teenagers still in full-time education on subsequent academic performance and school leaving decisions within a three equation structural model. Our results show that part-time work, educational attainment and school leaving decisions are all related to each other. Our analysis examines the impact of a wide range of variables on these events. We find, for instance, that class size not only affects exam performance, but has also an impact on school leaving decisions.

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File URL: ftp://ftp.repec.org/RePEc/wuk/ucloec/ucloec9619.ps
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University College London, Department of Economics in its series Discussion Papers with number 96-19 ISSN 1350-6722.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: Apr 1996
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wuk:ucloec:9619

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Postal: Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT
Web page: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/economics/
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Related research

Keywords: Teenage labour supply; educational attainment; training;

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References

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  1. Donald Robertson & James Symons, 2003. "Do Peer Groups Matter? Peer Group versus Schooling Effects on Academic Attainment," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 70(277), pages 31-53, February.
  2. Behrman, Jere R & Taubman, Paul, 1986. "Birth Order, Schooling, and Earnings," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages S121-45, July.
  3. Christian Dustmann & Najma Rajah & Arthur van Soest, 2003. "Class Size, Education, and Wages," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages F99-F120, February.
  4. Griliches, Zvi, 1980. " Schooling Interruption, Work While in School and the Returns from Schooling," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 82(2), pages 291-303.
  5. V. Joseph Hotz & Lixin Xu & Marta Tienda & Avner Ahituv, 1999. "Are There Returns to the Wages of Young Men from Working While in School?," JCPR Working Papers 101, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  6. Hanushek, Eric A, 1992. "The Trade-Off between Child Quantity and Quality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 84-117, February.
  7. Ronald G. Ehrenberg & Daniel R. Sherman, 1987. "Employment While in College, Academic Achievement, and Postcollege Outcomes: A Summary of Results," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 22(1), pages 1-23.
  8. Booth, Alison L & Satchell, Stephen E, 1994. "Apprenticeships and Job Tenure," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(4), pages 676-95, October.
  9. Gary S. Becker, 1981. "A Treatise on the Family," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number beck81-1.
  10. Becker, Gary S & Lewis, H Gregg, 1973. "On the Interaction between the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages S279-88, Part II, .
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Cabus, Sofie J. & De Witte, Kristof, 2012. "Naming and shaming in a ‘fair’ way. On disentangling the influence of policy in observed outcomes," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 767-787.
  2. Jeffrey S. DeSimone, 2008. "The Impact of Employment during School on College Student Academic Performance," NBER Working Papers 14006, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Benjamin Balsmeier & Heiko Peters, 2008. "Family Background or the Characteristics of Children: What Determines High School Success in Germany?," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 138, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  4. Franz Buscha & Arnaud Maurel & Lionel Page & Stefan Speckesser, 2007. "The Effect of High School Employment on Educational Attainment : A Conditional Difference-in-Differences Approach," Working Papers 2007-40, Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique.
  5. Charlene Kalenkoski & Sabrina Pabilonia, 2010. "Parental transfers, student achievement, and the labor supply of college students," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 23(2), pages 469-496, March.
  6. Kalenkoski, Charlene Marie & Pabilonia, Sabrina Wulff, 2012. "Time to work or time to play: The effect of student employment on homework, sleep, and screen time," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 211-221.
  7. Regula Geel & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2010. "Earning While Learning: Labor Market Returns to Student Employment During Tertiary Education," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0049, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
  8. Christian Dustmann & John Micklewright & Arthur Soest, 2009. "In-school labour supply, parental transfers, and wages," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 201-218, September.

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