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Competition in the School Curriculum: the economic and policy context in the UK

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  • Nick Adnett

    (Economics Division, Staffordshire University Business School)

Abstract

This paper provides a selective review of the contribution of economic analyses to contemporary debates about the reform of state schooling in the UK. Initially it briefly outlines the nature of recent market-based reforms in the UK and examines their underlying rationale. It then identifies some of the problems which the strengthening of the role of quasi-markets in education in the UK have caused. It concludes by providing an economic assessment of the impact of these reforms, concentrating upon the consequences for curriculum choice within schools of the increase in inter-school competition. This review provides a contextual background for an on- going research project investigating the impact of reform on curriculum in two local school markets.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Staffordshire University, Business School in its series Working Papers with number 001.

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Handle: RePEc:wuk:stafwp:001

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  1. Snower, Dennis J., 1994. "The Low-Skill, Bad-Job Trap," CEPR Discussion Papers 999, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Hilary Steedman, 1996. "Measuring the Quality of Educational Outputs: A Note," CEP Discussion Papers dp0302, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
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  4. Paul M Romer, 1999. "Endogenous Technological Change," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2135, David K. Levine.
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  7. David Card & Alan B. Krueger, 1996. "School Resources and Student Outcomes: An Overview of the Literature and New Evidence from North and South Carolina," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(4), pages 31-50, Fall.
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  9. West, Edwin G., 1991. "Public schools and excess burdens," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 159-169, June.
  10. L Feinstein & James Symons, 1997. "Attainment in Secondary School," CEP Discussion Papers dp0341, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  11. Caroline Minter Hoxby, 1996. "Are Efficiency and Equity in School Finance Substitutes or Complements?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(4), pages 51-72, Fall.
  12. Hanushek, Eric A, 1986. "The Economics of Schooling: Production and Efficiency in Public Schools," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 1141-77, September.
  13. repec:fth:prinin:366 is not listed on IDEAS
  14. Levin, Henry M., 1991. "The economics of educational choice," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 137-158, June.
  15. David Card & Alan Krueger, 1990. "Does School Quality Matter? Returns to Education and the Characteristics of Public Schools in the United States," NBER Working Papers 3358, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Henderson, Vernon & Mieszkowski, Peter & Sauvageau, Yvon, 1978. "Peer group effects and educational production functions," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 97-106, August.
  17. Fagerberg, Jan, 1994. "Technology and International Differences in Growth Rates," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(3), pages 1147-75, September.
  18. Skidelsky, Robert, 1995. "Public Finance and Education," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(3), pages 59-66, Autumn.
  19. Le Grand, Julian, 1991. "Quasi-markets and Social Policy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(408), pages 1256-67, September.
  20. Klemperer, Paul, 1987. "Markets with Consumer Switching Costs," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 102(2), pages 375-94, May.
  21. John Conlisk, 1996. "Why Bounded Rationality?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(2), pages 669-700, June.
  22. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 1995. "The Determinants of Children's Attainments: A Review of Methods and Findings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1829-1878, December.
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