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Convergence in Mississippi: A Spatial Approach

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Author Info

  • Mihai Nica

    (Jackson State University)

Abstract

Mississippi constitutes an interesting case study for analyzing the income convergence process because of several characteristics, such as the fairly large number of counties, its relative homogeneous economy and its low percapita income compared with the rest of the U.S. This study analyzes the convergence process at county level, from both a descriptive and general test perspective, applying a spatial statistics framework. It finds evidence of low but significant spatial correlation, suggesting an almost pattern-free spatial distribution of percapita income growth. It also finds significant evidence of b convergence, albeit at a low speed (less than one percent).

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/urb/papers/0408/0408007.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Urban/Regional with number 0408007.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: 25 Aug 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpur:0408007

Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 25
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

Related research

Keywords: Regional convergence; Spatial distribution; Spatial models;

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References

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  1. Plane, David A., 2003. "Perplexity, Complexity, Metroplexity, Microplexity: Perspectives for Future Research on Regional Growth and Change," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 33(1), pages 104-20.
  2. Matthew Higgins & Daniel Levy & Andrew Young, 2005. "Growth and Convergence across the U.S: Evidence from County-Level Data," Macroeconomics 0509023, EconWPA.
  3. Evans, Paul & Karras, Georgios, 1996. "Do Economies Converge? Evidence from a Panel of U.S. States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(3), pages 384-88, August.
  4. Quah, Danny, 1996. "Twin Peaks: Growth and Convergence in Models of Distribution Dynamics," CEPR Discussion Papers 1355, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Dowrick, Steve & Quiggin, John, 1997. "True Measures of GDP and Convergence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(1), pages 41-64, March.
  6. Islam, Nazrul, 1995. "Growth Empirics: A Panel Data Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(4), pages 1127-70, November.
  7. Helmut Hofer & Andreas Worgotter, 1997. "Regional Per Capita Income Convergence in Austria," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(1), pages 1-12.
  8. Carvalho, Vasco M. & Harvey, Andrew C., 2005. "Growth, cycles and convergence in US regional time series," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 667-686.
  9. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-99, June.
  10. Baumol, William J, 1986. "Productivity Growth, Convergence, and Welfare: What the Long-run Data Show," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(5), pages 1072-85, December.
  11. Danny Quah, 1996. "Twin Peaks: Growth and Convergence in Models of Distribution Dynamics," CEP Discussion Papers dp0280, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
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Cited by:
  1. Matthew J. Higgins & Daniel Levy & Andrew T. Young, 2007. "Black Populations and Economic Growth: An Extreme Bounds Analysis of Mississippi County-level Data," Emory Economics 0701, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta).

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