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How sensitive are estimated trends to data definitions? Results for East Asian and G-5 countries

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  • Yin-Wong Cheung

    (University of California at Santa Cruz)

  • Menzie Chinn
  • Tron Tran

Abstract

This paper examines whether test results characterizing per capita output as either trend or difference stationary are sensitive to whether output is valued in domestic currency terms, or in some international numeraire, such as the Summers and Heston (1991) international dollar. Using the conventional ADF test, and the Kwiatkowski et al. (1992) test with a trend stationary null, we find that for economies such as those of the East Asian countries, the best description of the persistence of the data does depend upon the valuation of output. No such discrepancy is found for the output series of the G-5 countries. We conclude that researchers should be extremely cautious about making generalizations regarding the time series properties of output.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Macroeconomics with number 9508004.

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Date of creation: 28 Aug 1995
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Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpma:9508004

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  1. Hall, Alastair R, 1994. "Testing for a Unit Root in Time Series with Pretest Data-Based Model Selection," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 12(4), pages 461-70, October.
  2. Levine, Ross & Renelt, David, 1991. "A sensitivity analysis of cross-country growth regressions," Policy Research Working Paper Series 609, The World Bank.
  3. Stanley Fischer, 1991. "Growth, Macroeconomics, and Development," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1991, Volume 6, pages 329-379 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Cheung, Yin-Wong & Chinn, Menzie David, 1996. "Deterministic, Stochastic, and Segmented Trends in Aggregate Output: A Cross-Country Analysis," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 48(1), pages 134-62, January.
  5. Shiller, Robert J. & Perron, Pierre, 1985. "Testing the random walk hypothesis : Power versus frequency of observation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 381-386.
  6. Fischer, S., 1991. "Growth, Macroeconomics, and Development," Working papers 580, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  7. Stanley Fischer, 1991. "Growth, Macroeconomics, and Development," NBER Working Papers 3702, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Kwiatkowski, Denis & Phillips, Peter C. B. & Schmidt, Peter & Shin, Yongcheol, 1992. "Testing the null hypothesis of stationarity against the alternative of a unit root : How sure are we that economic time series have a unit root?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1-3), pages 159-178.
  9. Summers, Robert & Heston, Alan, 1991. "The Penn World Table (Mark 5): An Expanded Set of International Comparisons, 1950-1988," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 106(2), pages 327-68, May.
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Cited by:
  1. Kristian Jönsson, 2011. "Testing Stationarity in Small‐ and Medium‐Sized Samples when Disturbances are Serially Correlated," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 73(5), pages 669-690, October.
  2. David E. A. Giles & Betty J. Johnson, 1999. "Taxes, Risk-Aversion, and the Size of the Underground Economy: A Nonparametric Analysis With New Zealand Data," Econometrics Working Papers 9910, Department of Economics, University of Victoria.
  3. Cheung, Yin-Wong & Fujii, Eiji, 2000. "Which Measure of Aggregate Output Should We Use?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 253-269, April.

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