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Employment Inequalities

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Author Info

  • Andrew Glyn

    (Corpus Christi College, Oxford Univ)

  • Wiener Salverda

    (University of Groningen)

Abstract

This paper documents the employment disadvantage faced by the less qualified part of the labor force and examines the factors that influence the differing extent of this disadvantage across OECD countries. We argue that employment rates for quartiles of the population ranked by educational qualification provide the best measure of employment disadvantage. We show that differences in these employment rates for the most- and least-educated quartiles vary substantially within Europe, but are not on average higher than those in the USA. The least qualified suffer the greatest employment disadvantage in countries in which the overall employment rates are low and, for men, the literacy test scores for the least qualified are relatively low. A high level of imports from the South appears to be associated with greater employment disadvantage, but there is no discernible tendency for a high level of wage dispersion, low benefits, or weak employment protection legislation to be associated with greater employment disadvantage. Labor market flexibility has not been the route by which some OECD countries have managed to minimize the employment disadvantage of the least qualified.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/mac/papers/0004/0004039.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Macroeconomics with number 0004039.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: 19 Oct 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpma:0004039

Note: Type of Document - Adobe Acrobat PDF; prepared on IBM PC; to print on PostScript; pages: 28; figures: included
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

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References

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  1. Pryor,Frederic L. & Schaffer,David L., 1999. "Who's Not Working and Why," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521651523, October.
  2. Nickell, S. & Layard, R., 1997. "Labour Market Institutions and Economic Performance," Papers 23, Centre for Economic Performance & Institute of Economics.
  3. Nickell, Stephen & Bell, Brian, 1995. "The Collapse in Demand for the Unskilled and Unemployment across the OECD," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(1), pages 40-62, Spring.
  4. Krueger, A. & Pischke, J.S., 1997. "Observations and Conjectures on the U.S. Employment Miracle," Working papers 97-15, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  5. David Card & Francis Kramarz & Thomas Lemieux, 1995. "Changes in the Relative Structure of Wages and Employment: A Comparison of the United States, Canada, and France," Working Papers 734, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  6. repec:fth:prinin:390 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 1994. "International Differences in Male Wage Inequality: Institutions versus Market Forces," NBER Working Papers 4678, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Blondal, Sveinbjorn & Pearson, Mark, 1995. "Unemployment and Other Non-employment Benefits," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(1), pages 136-69, Spring.
  9. Stephen Nickell, 1997. "Unemployment and Labor Market Rigidities: Europe versus North America," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(3), pages 55-74, Summer.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Floro Ernesto Caroleo, 2000. "Le Politiche per l'Occupazione in Europa: una Tassonomia Istituzionale," CELPE Discussion Papers 52, CELPE - Centre of Labour Economics and Economic Policy, University of Salerno, Italy.
  2. John Schmitt & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2002. "Is the OECD Jobs Strategy Behind US and British Employment and Unemployment Success in the 1990s?," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2002-06, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
  3. David R. Howell & Ellen Houston & William Milberg, 1999. "Demand Shifts and Earnings Inequality: Wage and Hours Growth by Occupation in the U.S., 1970-97," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 1999-02, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
  4. Daniele Checchi, 2000. "Does educational achievement help to explain income inequality?," Departmental Working Papers 2000-11, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
  5. Cathal O'Donoghue, 1999. "Estimating the Rate of Return to Education using Microsimulation," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 30(3), pages 249-265.
  6. Daniele Checchi, 2001. "Education, Inequality and Income Inequality," STICERD - Distributional Analysis Research Programme Papers 52, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
  7. Andrew Glyn, 2002. "Labour Market Success and Labour Market Reform: Lessons from Ireland and New Zealand," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2002-03, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
  8. Kenworthy, Lane, 2002. "Do affluent countries face an income-jobs tradeoff?," MPIfG Discussion Paper 01/10, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.

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