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Globalisation and Human Development

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  • Adam McCarty

    (Institute of Social Studies, The Hague)

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    Abstract

    Recent years have witnessed an unprecedented debate on globalisation. Attention has focused on the origin and main features of globalisation and its potential impact on world economic, political and social order. This research and policy debate is understandable, as the pace and consequences of globalisation have implications for every individual, community or nation. Globalisation touches all of us. It is changing the lives of people in developed and developing countries, of persons living in a busy cities in America, Hong Kong or Buenos Aires and even of indigenous people living in the remote areas of Africa, Latin America or Asia. Recent financial and economic regional crises ranging from Mexico to Russia and East Asia, the failure of the New Millennium ‘Development’ Trade Round in Seattle, hot debates at the UNCTAD-10 Conference in Bangkok, and the recent South-South meeting in April 2000, have brought the discussion on globalisation to a new peak of rhetoric and passion. A selection of prominent statements and judgements on the nature of globalisation are presented here, but the debate is still far from over. Yet what is globalisation? Is it good or bad for human development? How does it affect the developing countries? Is it something new, or part of a longer historical process? What can developing countries do to maximise the benefits from globalisation and minimise its risks ? How to protect vulnerable groups from the volatility of the globalisation wave?

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by EconWPA in its series International Trade with number 0110001.

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    Length: 31 pages
    Date of creation: 11 Oct 2001
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpit:0110001

    Note: Type of Document - ; pages: 31; figures: included. MDE Working Paper 01/2001, National Economics University, Hanoi, Vietnam.
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    Web page: http://128.118.178.162

    Related research

    Keywords: globalisation; human development; Vietnam;

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    1. Birdsall, Nancy & Ross, David & Sabot, Richard, 1995. "Inequality and Growth Reconsidered: Lessons from East Asia," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 9(3), pages 477-508, September.
    2. Winters, L. Alan, 2000. "Trade, Trade Policy and Poverty: What Are The Links?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2382, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. John Whalley, 1999. "Developing Countries in the Global Economy: A Forward Looking View," CSGR Working papers series 36/99, Centre for the Study of Globalisation and Regionalisation (CSGR), University of Warwick.
    4. Wood, Adrian, 1997. "Openness and Wage Inequality in Developing Countries: The Latin American Challenge to East Asian Conventional Wisdom," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 11(1), pages 33-57, January.
    5. Paul Collier & Jan Willem Gunning, 1999. "Why Has Africa Grown Slowly?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 3-22, Summer.
    6. Srinivasan, T.N. & Bhagwati, J., 1999. "Outward-Orientation and Development: Are Revisionist Right?," Papers 806, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
    7. L. Alan Winters, 2000. "Trade Liberalisation and Poverty," PRUS Working Papers 07, Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, University of Sussex.
    8. Anne Krueger, 1999. "The Developing Countries and the Next Round of Multilateral Trade Negotiations," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(7), pages 909-932, 09.
    9. Pissarides, Christopher A, 1997. "Learning by Trading and the Returns to Human Capital in Developing Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 11(1), pages 17-32, January.
    10. Krueger, Anne O., 1999. "Developing countries and the next round of multilateral trade negotiations," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2118, The World Bank.
    11. T. N. Srinivasan & Jagdish Bhagwati, 1999. "Outward-Orientation and Development: Are Revisionists Right," Working Papers 806, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    12. Richard A. Easterlin, 2000. "The Worldwide Standard of Living since 1800," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(1), pages 7-26, Winter.
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