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Self-Selection and Student Achievement

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Author Info

  • Honggao Cao

    (Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan)

Abstract

Students in any schools are not a random collection from the population. They become schoolmates because of their parents' selections of school quality that are contingent on their genetic abilities and family background. Even specified correctly, the conventional educational production functions cannot be used to find the effects of school inputs or quality. Therefore, the weak or zero relationship between school inputs and student achievement widely documented in the literature by no means implies that school inputs or quality does not matter. Further, since students enter schools by self-selection, any observed differences in student achievement between public and private schools do not necessarily mean that these schools have any differences in the effectiveness of operation.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/hew/papers/0501/0501003.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series HEW with number 0501003.

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Length: 24 pages
Date of creation: 08 Jan 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwphe:0501003

Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 24
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

Related research

Keywords: Self-selection; school quality; educational production function; student achievement;

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  1. Brown, Byron W & Saks, Daniel H, 1975. "The Production and Distribution of Cognitive Skills within Schools," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 83(3), pages 571-93, June.
  2. Willis, Robert J & Rosen, Sherwin, 1979. "Education and Self-Selection," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages S7-36, October.
  3. David Card & Alan Krueger, 1990. "Does School Quality Matter? Returns to Education and the Characteristics of Public Schools in the United States," NBER Working Papers 3358, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Hanushek, Eric A, 1986. "The Economics of Schooling: Production and Efficiency in Public Schools," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 1141-77, September.
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