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Do Individual Investors Drive Post-Earnings Announcement Drift? Direct Evidence from Personal Trades

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Author Info

  • David Hirshleifer

    (Fisher College of Business, Ohio State University)

  • James N. Myers

    (University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign)

  • Linda A. Myers

    (University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign - Department of Accountancy)

  • Siew Hong Teoh

    (Fisher College of Business, Ohio State University)

Abstract

This study examines whether individual investors are the source of post- earnings announcement drift (PEAD). We provide evidence on how individual investors trade in response to extreme quarterly earnings surprises and on the relation between individual investors' trades and subsequent abnormal returns. We find no evidence that either individuals or any sub-category of individuals in our sample cause PEAD. Individuals are significant net buyers after both negative and positive earnings surprises. There is no indication that trading by any of our investor sub-categories explains the concentration of drift at subsequent earnings announcement dates. While post-announcement individual net buying is a significant negative predictor of stock returns over the next three quarters, individual investor trading fails to subsume any of the power of extreme earnings surprises to predict future abnormal returns.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/fin/papers/0412/0412003.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Finance with number 0412003.

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Length: 40 pages
Date of creation: 04 Dec 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpfi:0412003

Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 40. PDF
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

Related research

Keywords: post earnings-announcement drift; trading activity; individual investors; market efficiency;

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References

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  1. Karpoff, Jonathan M, 1986. " A Theory of Trading Volume," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 41(5), pages 1069-87, December.
  2. Hirshleifer, David, 2001. "Investor Psychology and Asset Pricing," MPRA Paper 5300, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Fischer, Paul E. & Verrecchia, Robert E., 1999. "Public information and heuristic trade," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 89-124, February.
  4. Lee, Charles M. C., 1992. "Earnings news and small traders : An intraday analysis," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(2-3), pages 265-302, August.
  5. De Long, J. Bradford & Shleifer, Andrei & Summers, Lawrence H. & Waldmann, Robert J., 1990. "Noise Trader Risk in Financial Markets," Scholarly Articles 3725552, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  6. Grinblatt, Mark & Keloharju, Matti, 2000. "The investment behavior and performance of various investor types: a study of Finland's unique data set," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 43-67, January.
  7. JOSHUA D. COVAL & David Hirshleifer & TYLER G. SHUMWAY, 2004. "Can Individual Investors Beat the Market?," Finance 0412005, EconWPA.
  8. Brad M. Barber & Terrance Odean, 2000. "Trading Is Hazardous to Your Wealth: The Common Stock Investment Performance of Individual Investors," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 55(2), pages 773-806, 04.
  9. Terrance Odean, 1999. "Do Investors Trade Too Much?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(5), pages 1279-1298, December.
  10. Kent Daniel & David Hirshleifer & Avanidhar Subrahmanyam, 1998. "Investor Psychology and Security Market Under- and Overreactions," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 53(6), pages 1839-1885, December.
  11. Demski, Joel S. & Feltham, Gerald A., 1994. "Market response to financial reports," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1-2), pages 3-40, January.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Frieder, Laura, 2008. "Investor and price response to patterns in earnings surprises," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 259-283, August.
  2. Campbell, John Y & Ramadorai, Tarun & Schwartz, Allie, 2007. "Caught On Tape: Institutional Trading, Stock Returns, and Earnings Announcements," CEPR Discussion Papers 6390, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Amil Dasgupta & Andrea Prat & Michela Verardo, 2011. "Institutional Trade Persistence and Long‐Term Equity Returns," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 66(2), pages 635-653, 04.
  4. Rongsheng Shi & Zhi Xu & Zhengrong Chen & Jing Huang, 2012. "Does attention affect individual investors' investment return?," China Finance Review International, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 2(2), pages 143-162, April.
  5. G. Geoffrey Booth & Juha-Pekka Kallunki & Petri Sahlström & Jaakko Tyynelä, 2011. "Foreign vs domestic investors and the post-announcement drift," International Journal of Managerial Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 7(3), pages 220-237, June.
  6. Fabrizio Lillo & Salvatore Miccich\`e & Michele Tumminello & Jyrki Piilo & Rosario Nunzio Mantegna, 2012. "How news affect the trading behavior of different categories of investors in a financial market," Papers 1207.3300, arXiv.org.
  7. Battalio, Robert H. & Mendenhall, Richard R., 2005. "Earnings expectations, investor trade size, and anomalous returns around earnings announcements," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 289-319, August.
  8. Kaniel, Ron & Liu, Shuming & Saar, Gideon & Titman, Sheridan, 2011. "Individual Investor Trading and Return Patterns around Earnings Announcements," CEPR Discussion Papers 8259, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. David O. Lucca & Emanuel Moench, 2011. "The pre-FOMC announcement drift," Staff Reports 512, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  10. Weber, Martin & Welfens, Frank, 2007. "The Repurchase Behavior of Individual Investors: An Experimental Investigation," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 07-44, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim & Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.

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