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A Laboratory Experiment of Knowledge Diffusion Dynamics

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  • Piergiuseppe Morone

    (University of Rome 'La Sapienza')

  • Richard Taylor

    (Centre for Policy Modelling, Manchester Metropolitan University Business School)

Abstract

This paper aims to study, by means of a laboratory experiment and a simulation model, some of the mechanisms which dominate the phenomenon of knowledge diffusion in the process that is called ‘interactive learning’. We examine how knowledge spreads in different networks in which agents interact by word of mouth. We define a regular network, a randomly generated network and a small world network structured as graphs consisting of agents (vertices) and connections (edges), situated on a wrapped grid forming a lattice. The target of the paper is to identify the key factors which affect the speed and the distribution of knowledge diffusion. We will show how these factors can be classified as follow: (1) learning strategies adopted by heterogeneous agents; (2) network architecture within which the interaction takes place; (3) geographical distribution of agents and their relative initial levels of knowledge. We shall also attempt to single out the relative effect of each of the above factors.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/exp/papers/0407/0407004.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Experimental with number 0407004.

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Length: 20 pages
Date of creation: 20 Jul 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpex:0407004

Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 20
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

Related research

Keywords: Knowledge; Network; Small world; Experiment; Simulation.;

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References

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  1. Roland Benabou, 1991. "Workings of a City: Location, Education, and Production," NBER Technical Working Papers 0113, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Piergiuseppe Morone & Richard Taylor, 2004. "Small World Dynamics and The Process of Knowledge Diffusion: The Case of The Metropolitan Area of Greater Santiago De Chile," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 7(2), pages 5.
  3. Brock, William A & Durlauf, Steven N, 2001. "Discrete Choice with Social Interactions," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(2), pages 235-60, April.
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  11. Daron Acemoglu & Joshua Angrist, 1999. "How Large are the Social Returns to Education? Evidence from Compulsory Schooling Laws," Working papers 99-30, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  12. Edward E. Glaeser & Bruce Sacerdote & Jose A. Scheinkman, 1995. "Crime and Social Interactions," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1738, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  13. Bala, Venkatesh & Goyal, Sanjeev, 1998. "Learning from Neighbours," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(3), pages 595-621, July.
  14. Glen Ellison, 2010. "Learning, Local Interaction, and Coordination," Levine's Working Paper Archive 391, David K. Levine.
  15. Chwe, Michael Suk-Young, 2000. "Communication and Coordination in Social Networks," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(1), pages 1-16, January.
  16. Ellison, Glenn, 2000. "Basins of Attraction, Long-Run Stochastic Stability, and the Speed of Step-by-Step Evolution," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(1), pages 17-45, January.
  17. George A. Akerlof, 1997. "Social Distance and Social Decisions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(5), pages 1005-1028, September.
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