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Does Telecommuting Reduce Vehicle-miles Traveled? An Aggregate Time Series Analysis for the U. S

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Author Info

  • Sangho Choo

    (University of California, Davis)

  • Patricia L. Mokhtarian

    (University of California, Davis)

  • Ilan Salomon

    (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

Abstract

This study examines the impact of telecommuting on passenger vehicle- miles traveled (VMT) through a multivariate time series analysis of aggregate nationwide data spanning 1966-1999 for all variables except telecommuting, and 1988-1998 for telecommuting. The analysis was conducted in two stages. In the first stage, VMT (1966-1999) was modeled as a function of conventional variables representing economic activity, transportation price, transportation supply and socio-demographics. In the second stage, the residuals of the first stage (1988-1998) were modeled as a function of the number of telecommuters. We also assessed the change in annual VMT per telecommuter as well as VMT per telecommuting occasion, for 1998. The models suggest that telecommuting reduces VMT, with 94% confidence. Together with independent external evidence, the results suggest a reduction in annual VMT on the order of 0.8% or less. Even with impacts that small, when informally compared to similar reductions in VMT due to public transit ridership, telecommuting appears to be far more cost-effective in terms of public sector expenditures.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/em/papers/0505/0505001.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Econometrics with number 0505001.

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Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: 05 May 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpem:0505001

Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 43
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

Related research

Keywords: aggregate analysis; telecommuting; teleworking; time series analysis; vehicle-miles traveled (VMT) modeling/forecasting;

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References

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  1. David L. Greene, 1992. "Vehicle Use and Fuel Economy: How Big is the "Rebound" Effect?," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 117-144.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Margaret Walls & Peter Nelson & Elena Safirova, 2005. "Telecommuting and environmental policy - lessons from the Ecommute program," ERSA conference papers ersa05p801, European Regional Science Association.
  2. Aguiléra, Anne & Guillot, Caroline & Rallet, Alain, 2012. "Mobile ICTs and physical mobility: Review and research agenda," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 664-672.
  3. Dissanayake, Dilum & Morikawa, Takayuki, 2008. "Impact assessment of satellite centre-based telecommuting on travel and air quality in developing countries by exploring the link between travel behaviour and urban form," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 42(6), pages 883-894, July.
  4. Santos, Georgina & Behrendt, Hannah & Teytelboym, Alexander, 2010. "Part II: Policy instruments for sustainable road transport," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 46-91.
  5. Amalia Polydoropoulou & Athena Tsirimpa, 2012. "Women’s Time Use with ICT and Physical Travel in Greek Urban and Rural Areas," SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, University of Piraeus, vol. 62(1-2), pages 72-91, January -.
  6. Patricia Mokhtarian & Ilan Salomon & Sangho Choo, 2005. "Measuring the Measurable: Why Can't We Agree on the Number of Telecommuters in the U.S.?," Labor and Demography 0508011, EconWPA.
  7. Giovanni Circella, 2006. "Towards the adoption of technological innovations: decision processes in transport policy definition," ERSA conference papers ersa06p556, European Regional Science Association.
  8. Marius Thériault & Paul Y. Villeneuve & Marie-Hélène Vandersmissen & François Des Rosiers, 2005. "Homeworking, telecommuting and journey to workplaces - Are differences among genders and professions varying over space?," ERSA conference papers ersa05p141, European Regional Science Association.
  9. Pengyu Zhu, 2012. "Are telecommuting and personal travel complements or substitutes?," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 619-639, April.
  10. Choo, Sangho & Mokhtarian, Patricia L, 2008. "Telecommunications and travel demand and supply: Aggregate structural equation models for the US," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt6q8518s4, University of California Transportation Center.
  11. Walls, Margaret & Safirova, Elena, 2004. "A Review of the Literature on Telecommuting and Its Implications for Vehicle Travel and Emissions," Discussion Papers dp-04-44, Resources For the Future.

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