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How people with disabilities fare when public policies change

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  • R. V. Burkhauser
  • R. H. Haveman
  • B. L. Wolfe

Abstract

Changes in public policy and in macroeconomic conditions have dramatically affected the economic well-being of people with disabilities over the past two decades, both absolutely and relative to people without disabilities. Using data from the Current Population Survey (1968-1988), we find that the households of white or well-educated males with disabilities have fully recovered from the program cuts and recession of the early 1980s. However, much of this recovery was due to additional earnings by other household members. The households of males who are “doubly handicapped”-nonwhite or poorly educated males with disabilities-have not recovered. We conclude that the new mandates on business aimed at integrating people with disabilities into the workplace are not likely to significantly benefit the doubly handicapped.

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Paper provided by University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty in its series Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers with number 974-92.

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Handle: RePEc:wop:wispod:974-92

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Cited by:
  1. David S. Salkever & Marisa E. Domino, 1997. "Within Group "Structural" Tests of Labor-Market Discrimination: A Study of Persons with Serious Disabilities," NBER Working Papers 5931, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Bound, John & Cullen, Julie Berry & Nichols, Austin & Schmidt, Lucie, 2004. "The welfare implications of increasing disability insurance benefit generosity," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 88(12), pages 2487-2514, December.
  3. Richard V. Burkhauser & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2000. "Microdata Panel Data and Public Policy: National and Cross-National Perspectives," Center for Policy Research Working Papers, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University 23, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  4. John Bound & Julie Berry Cullen & Austin Nichols & Lucie Schmidt, 2002. "The Welfare Implications of Increasing DI Benefit Generosity," Working Papers, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center wp024, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  5. Burkhauser, Richard V. & Butler, J. S. & Kim, Yang Woo, 1995. "The importance of employer accommodation on the job duration of workers with disabilities: A hazard model approach," Labour Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 109-130, June.

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