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Cyberspace Auctions and Pricing Issues: A Review of Empirical Findings

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  • Patrick Bajari
  • Ali Hortacsu

Abstract

April 2002 This article surveys empirical findings from recent studies of Internet auctions and summarizes the economic insights gained from these findings. The main questions addressed in this article are: What are the rules of the game used in online auctions and how do these rules influence bidding behavior, such as sniping or bid shading? Is a good reputation, as measured by a seller’s feedback, valued by bidders and is feedback important in making online markets function well? Is the “winner’s curse” present in online auctions? How do minimum bids and secret reserve prices affect bidding and final sale prices? Working Papers Index

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Stanford University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 02005.

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Date of creation: Apr 2002
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Handle: RePEc:wop:stanec:02005

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References

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  1. Peters,M. & Severinov,S., 2001. "Internet auctions with many traders," Working papers 11, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  2. Roger B. Myerson, 1978. "Optimal Auction Design," Discussion Papers 362, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  3. Paul Milgrom & Robert J. Weber, 1981. "A Theory of Auctions and Competitive Bidding," Discussion Papers 447R, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  4. Alvin E. Roth & Axel Ockenfels, 2000. "Last Minute Bidding and the Rules for Ending Second-Price Auctions: Theory and Evidence from a Natural Experiment on the Internet," NBER Working Papers 7729, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Levin, Dan & Smith, James L, 1994. "Equilibrium in Auctions with Entry," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 585-99, June.
  6. Daniel Houser & John Wooders, 2006. "Reputation in Auctions: Theory, and Evidence from eBay," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(2), pages 353-369, 06.
  7. Patrick Bajari & Ali Hortacsu, 2000. "Winner's Curse, Reserve Prices and Endogenous Entry: Empirical Insights from eBay Auctions," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1927, Econometric Society.
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Cited by:
  1. Timothy Salmon & Bart Wilson, 2008. "Second chance offers versus sequential auctions: theory and behavior," Economic Theory, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 47-67, January.
  2. Kosmopoulou, Georgia & De Silva, Dakshina G., 2007. "The effect of shill bidding upon prices: Experimental evidence," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 291-313, April.
  3. Edward Castronova, 2003. "The Price of "Man" and "Woman": A Hedonic Pricing Model of Avatar Attributes in a Synthetic World," CESifo Working Paper Series 957, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Nicola Dimitri, 2007. "Last minute bidding equilibrium in second price internet auctions," Department of Economic Policy, Finance and Development (DEPFID) University of Siena 001, Department of Economic Policy, Finance and Development (DEPFID), University of Siena.
  5. Eiichiro Kazumori & John McMillan, 2003. "Selliing Online Versus Offline," Levine's Working Paper Archive 506439000000000254, David K. Levine.

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