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It's Not Just the ATMs: Technology, Firm Strategies, Jobs, and Earnings in Retail Banking

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  • Larry W. Hunter
  • Annette Bernhardt
  • Katherine L. Hughes
  • Eva Skuratowicz
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    Abstract

    The authors examine trends in job content and earnings in selected jobs in two American banks. Firm restructuring and technological changes resulted in higher earnings for college-educated workers. The banks followed different strategies in implementing these changes for lower-skill jobs, with different effects on bank tellers in particular. The authors conclude that technology enables workplace reform but does not determine its effect on jobs and earnings; these effects are contingent on managerial strategies. This focus on organizational processes and managerial strategy provides a complementary approach to accounts of growing inequality that center solely on the role of individual skills and technological change.

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    File URL: http://fic.wharton.upenn.edu/fic/papers/00/0031.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania in its series Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers with number 00-31.

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    Date of creation: Jun 2000
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    Handle: RePEc:wop:pennin:00-31

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    1. Doms, Mark & Dunne, Timothy & Troske, Kenneth R, 1997. "Workers, Wages, and Technology," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(1), pages 253-90, February.
    2. Timothy F. Bresnahan & Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 2002. "Information Technology, Workplace Organization, And The Demand For Skilled Labor: Firm-Level Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 117(1), pages 339-376, February.
    3. Berman, Eli & Bound, John & Griliches, Zvi, 1994. "Changes in the Demand for Skilled Labor within U.S. Manufacturing: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufactures," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(2), pages 367-97, May.
    4. Levy, Frank & Murnane, Richard J, 1996. "With What Skills Are Computers a Complement?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 258-62, May.
    5. Levy, Frank & Murnane, Richard J, 1992. "U.S. Earnings Levels and Earnings Inequality: A Review of Recent Trends and Proposed Explanations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 1333-81, September.
    6. Rebecca S. Demsetz, 1997. "Human resources needs in the evolving financial sector," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 3(Nov).
    7. Marino Regini & Jim Kitay & Martin Baethge (ed.), 1999. "From Tellers to Sellers: Changing Employment Relations in Banks," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026218193, December.
    8. David H. Autor & Lawrence F. Katz & Alan B. Krueger, 1997. "Computing Inequality: Have Computers Changed the Labor Market?," NBER Working Papers 5956, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Paul Osterman, 1994. "How common is workplace transformation and who adopts it?," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 47(2), pages 173-188, January.
    10. Dinardo, J.E. & Pischke, J.S., 1996. "The Returns to Computer Use Revisited: Have Pencils Changed the Wage Structure Too?," Working papers 96-12, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    11. Larry W. Hunter & Lorin M. Hitt, 2001. "What Makes a High-Performance Workplace? Evidence from Retail Bank Branches," Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers 00-30, Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania.
    12. Peter Cappelli, 1996. "Technology and skill requirements: implications for establishment wage structures," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue May, pages 139-156.
    13. David, Paul A, 1990. "The Dynamo and the Computer: An Historical Perspective on the Modern Productivity Paradox," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 355-61, May.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. ATMs and unemployment – Why Obama has a point
      by Don Arthur in Club Troppo on 2011-06-19 04:51:02
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    Cited by:
    1. Nick Bloom & Luis Garicano & Raffaella Sadun & John Van Reenen, 2009. "The distinct effects of information technology and communication technology on firm organization," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 25477, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Bloom, Nicholas & Sadun, Raffaella & Van Reenen, John, 2007. "Americans Do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle," CEPR Discussion Papers 6291, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Panapoulou, Maria, 2002. "Technological and Structural Change in the European Banking Industry," EIFC - Technology and Finance Working Papers 13, United Nations University, Institute for New Technologies.
    4. Takahito Kanamori & Kazuyuki Motohashi, 2006. "Centralization or Decentralization of Decision Rights? Impact on IT Performance of Firms," Discussion papers 06032, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    5. Hervas-Oliver, Jose-Luis & Sempere-Ripoll, Francisca & Boronat-Moll, Carles, 2012. "Process innovation objectives and management complementarities: patterns, drivers, co-adoption and performance effects," MERIT Working Papers 051, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

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