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An Empirical Analysis of Same-Sex and Opposite-Sex Couples: Do "Likes" Still Like "Likes" in the '90s?

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  • Lisa K. Jepsen
  • Christopher A. Jepsen

Abstract

This paper uses 1990 census data to test Becker's predictions of gender-based specialization for labor-market outcomes by comparing the matching behaviors of four types of couples: same-sex male couples, same-sex female couples, opposite-sex cohabiting couples, and married couples. Correlations and conditional logit results support Becker's predictions of positive assortive mating but not negative assortive mating, nor do they find marked differences across types of couples. Binary logit results find that married couples are more alike than unmarried couples, and that opposite-sex couples are more alike than same-sex couples.

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Paper provided by Institute for Policy Resarch at Northwestern University in its series IPR working papers with number 99-5.

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Handle: RePEc:wop:nwuipr:99-5

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  1. Bergstrom, Theodore C & Bagnoli, Mark, 1993. "Courtship as a Waiting Game," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(1), pages 185-202, February.
  2. Dan Black & Gary Gates & Seth Sanders & Lowell Taylor, 2000. "Demographics of the gay and lesbian population in the United States: Evidence from available systematic data sources," Demography, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 139-154, May.
  3. Daniel, K., 1991. "Does Marriage Make Men More Productive?," University of Chicago - Economics Research Center 92-2, Chicago - Economics Research Center.
  4. Dan A. Black & Hoda R. Makar & Seth G. Sanders & Lowell J. Taylor, 2003. "The earnings effects of sexual orientation," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 56(3), pages 449-469, April.
  5. M. V. Lee Badgett, 1995. "The wage effects of sexual orientation discrimination," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(4), pages 726-739, July.
  6. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "A Theory of Marriage," NBER Chapters, in: Economics of the Family: Marriage, Children, and Human Capital, pages 299-351 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Sanders Korenman & David Neumark, 1991. "Does Marriage Really Make Men More Productive?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(2), pages 282-307.
  8. Lam, D. & Schoeni, R.F., 1995. "Family Ties and Labor Markets in the United States and Brazil," Papers 95-04, RAND - Reprint Series.
  9. Saul Hoffman & Greg Duncan, 1988. "Multinomial and conditional logit discrete-choice models in demography," Demography, Springer, vol. 25(3), pages 415-427, August.
  10. David Lam, 1988. "Marriage Markets and Assortative Mating with Household Public Goods: Theoretical Results and Empirical Implications," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 23(4), pages 462-487.
  11. Suen, Wing & Lui, Hon-Kwong, 1999. "A Direct Test of the Efficient Marriage Market Hypothesis," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 37(1), pages 29-46, January.
  12. Becker, Gary S & Landes, Elisabeth M & Michael, Robert T, 1977. "An Economic Analysis of Marital Instability," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(6), pages 1141-87, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Macours, Karen & de Janvry, Alain & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 2004. "Insecurity of property rights and matching in the tenancy market," CUDARE Working Paper Series 0992, University of California at Berkeley, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Policy.
  2. Dan Black & Gary Gates & Seth Sanders & Lowell Taylor, 1999. "Demographics of the Gay and Lesbian Population in the United States: Evidence from Available Systematic Data Sources," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 12, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.

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