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Are married women spatially constrained? A test of gender differentials in labour market outcomes

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  • Harminder Battu

    ()

  • Paul Seaman
  • Peter Sloane

Abstract

Numerous studies have shown that females fare less well than males in terms of relative earnings and occupational attainment, but few acknowledge the role played by differential gender migration patterns. This paper examines the relationship between marital status, spatial migration and various aspects of female labour market outcomes. It builds on the existing literature by analysing the issue for the first time using British data and focuses particularly on the possibility of constrained migration resulting in overeducation. Our research utilises the only British dataset - the Social Change and Economic Life Initiative (SCELI) dataset - that allows the measurement of overeducation alongside other dimensions of labour market outcomes.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa98p24.

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Date of creation: Aug 1998
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Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa98p24

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  1. Mincer, Jacob, 1978. "Family Migration Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 749-73, October.
  2. P. J. Sloane & H. Battu & P. T. Seaman, 1999. "Overeducation, undereducation and the British labour market," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(11), pages 1437-1453.
  3. Frank, Robert H, 1978. "Family Location Constraints and the Geographic Distribution of Female Professionals," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(1), pages 117-30, February.
  4. Ofek, Haim & Merrill, Yesook, 1997. "Labor Immobility and the Formation of Gender Wage Gaps in Local Markets," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(1), pages 28-47, January.
  5. Frank, Robert H, 1978. "Why Women Earn Less: The Theory and Estimation of Differential Overqualification," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 68(3), pages 360-73, June.
  6. Molho, Ian, 1986. "Theories of Migration: A Review," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 33(4), pages 396-419, November.
  7. P. J. Sloane & H. Battu & P. T. Seaman, 1996. "Overeducation and the formal education/experience and training trade-off," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(8), pages 511-515.
  8. McGoldrick, KimMarie & Robst, John, 1996. "Gender Differences in Overeducation: A Test of the Theory of Differential Overqualification," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 280-84, May.
  9. Nachum Sicherman, 1987. "Over-Education in the Labor Market," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State 48, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
  10. Keith, Kristen & McWilliams, Abagail, 1997. "Job Mobility and Gender-Based Wage Growth Differentials," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(2), pages 320-33, April.
  11. Sattinger, Michael, 1993. "Assignment Models of the Distribution of Earnings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 31(2), pages 831-80, June.
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Cited by:
  1. Jean-Pascal Guironnet, 2005. "La suréducation en France : Vers une dévalorisation des diplômes du supérieur ?," Working Papers, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC) 05-10, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
  2. Arnaud Chevalier, 2000. "Graduate over-education in the UK," CEE Discussion Papers, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE 0007, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  3. Nivalainen, Satu, 1999. "The effects of family life cycle, family ties and distance on migration: micro evidence from Finland in 1994," ERSA conference papers, European Regional Science Association ersa99pa271, European Regional Science Association.
  4. Büchel, Felix & Battu, Harminder, 2002. "The Theory of Differential Overqualification: Does it Work?," IZA Discussion Papers 511, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Stuart Campbell, 2013. "Over-education among A8 migrants in the UK," DoQSS Working Papers, Department of Quantitative Social Science - Institute of Education, University of London 13-09, Department of Quantitative Social Science - Institute of Education, University of London.
  6. Battu, H. & Belfield, C. R. & Sloane, P. J., . "Overeducation Among Graduates: A Cohort View," Working Papers, Department of Economics, University of Aberdeen 98-03, Department of Economics, University of Aberdeen.

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