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Parent's Education , School-Age Children, and Household Location in American Cities

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  • William Sander

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  • William Testa
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    Abstract

    The revealed residential choice of city versus suburbs within large metropolitan areas is examined with particular focus on families with children, especially those with college-educated parents. Probit and bivariate probit estimates are presented for 15 large metropolitan areas in the United States, and for boroughs within New York City. Data are drawn from the Census Bureau?s American Community Survey. It is shown that overall more affluent and educated families with school-age children are less likely to live in many large central cities including Boston, Chicago, New York City, and Philadelphia with a few important exceptions including Charlotte, Seattle, and the borough of Manhattan. We contrast our results with estimates for married and never married respondents without school-age children.

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    File URL: http://www-sre.wu.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa13/ERSA2013_paper_00054.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa13p54.

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    Date of creation: Nov 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa13p54

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    Web page: http://www.ersa.org

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    Keywords: cities; households; children; location;

    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. BRUECKNER, Jan K. & THISSE, Jacques-François & ZENOU, Yves, . "Why is central Paris rich and downtown Detroit poor? An amenity-based theory," CORE Discussion Papers RP, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE) -1370, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    2. Jan K. Brueckner & Stuart S. Rosenthal, 2005. "Gentrification and Neighborhood Housing Cycles: Will America's Future Downtowns be Rich?," CESifo Working Paper Series, CESifo Group Munich 1579, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Patrick Bajari & Matthew E. Kahn, 2002. "Estimating Housing Demand with an Application to Explaining Racial Segregation in Cities," Working Papers, Stanford University, Department of Economics 02011, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
    4. Wheaton, William C, 1977. "Income and Urban Residence: An Analysis of Consumer Demand for Location," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 67(4), pages 620-31, September.
    5. Patrick Bayer & Fernando Ferreira & Robert McMillan, 2007. "A Unified Framework for Measuring Preferences for Schools and Neighborhoods," Working Papers, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau 07-27, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    6. Edward L. Glaeser & Matthew E. Kahn, 2001. "Decentralized Employment and the Transformation of the American City," NBER Working Papers 8117, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. William Sander & William A. Testa, 2009. "Education and Household Location in Chicago," Growth and Change, Gatton College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky, Gatton College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky, vol. 40(1), pages 116-139.
    8. Julie Berry Cullen & Steven D. Levitt, 1999. "Crime, Urban Flight, And The Consequences For Cities," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(2), pages 159-169, May.
    9. Michael Storper & Allen J. Scott, 2009. "Rethinking human capital, creativity and urban growth," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, vol. 9(2), pages 147-167, March.
    10. William Sander, 2005. "On the demand for city living," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(3), pages 351-364, June.
    11. Neal, Derek, 1995. "Industry-Specific Human Capital: Evidence from Displaced Workers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(4), pages 653-77, October.
    12. Joseph G. Altonji & Todd E. Elder & Christopher R. Taber, 2000. "Selection on Observed and Unobserved Variables: Assessing the Effectiveness of Catholic Schools," NBER Working Papers 7831, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. William Sander & William Testa, 2010. "Educational attainment and household location: the case of Chicago's lakefront," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q IV, pages 116-129.
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