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Explaining Patterns of Corruption in the Russian Regions

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  • Phyllis Dininio
  • Robert W. Orttung

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    Abstract

    Corruption is one of the key problems facing the Russian state as it seeks to evolve out of its socialist past. Naturally, regional patterns of corruption exist across a country as large and diverse as the Russian Federation. To explain these variations, we analyze 2002 data from Transparency International and the Information for Democracy Foundation that provides the first effort to measure differences in incidence of corruption across 40 Russian regions. We find that corruption in Russia primarily is a structural problem, and not one related to its institutions. Within each region, the amount of corruption increases as the size of the regional economy grows, the per capita income decreases, and the population decreases. Russian policymakers can therefore work to reduce corruption by encouraging economic development outside of the key centers of Moscow and St. Petersburg. Because the data show that voter turnout also lowers corruption, policymakers can also fight corruption by fostering more political accountability in elections.

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    File URL: http://www.wdi.umich.edu/files/Publications/WorkingPapers/wp727.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan in its series William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series with number 727.

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    Length: pages
    Date of creation: 01 Nov 2004
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2004-727

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    Keywords: Corruption; Russia;

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    1. Andrei Shleifer & Daniel Treisman, 2003. "A Normal Country," NBER Working Papers 10057, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Slinko, Irina & Yakovlev, Evgeny & Zhuravskaya, Ekaterina, 2003. "Institutional Subversion: Evidence from Russian Regions," CEPR Discussion Papers 4024, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Treisman, Daniel, 2000. "The causes of corruption: a cross-national study," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 399-457, June.
    4. Harry G. Broadman, 2002. "Unleashing Russia's Business Potential : Lessons from the Regions for Building Market Institutions," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14096, October.
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    Cited by:
    1. William Tompson, 2007. "From "Clientelism" to a "Client-Centred Orientation"? The Challenge of Public Administration Reform in Russia," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 536, OECD Publishing.

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