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Demand collapse or credit crunch to firms ? evidence from the world bank's financial crisis survey in Eastern Europe

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  • Nguyen, Ha
  • Qian, Rong

Abstract

While there is a consensus that the 2008-2009 crisis was triggered by financial market disruptions in the United States, there is little agreement on whether the transmission of the crisis and the subsequent prolonged recession are due to credit factors or to a collapse of demand for goods and services. This paper assesses whether the primary effect of the global crisis on Eastern European firms took the form of an adverse demand shock or a credit crunch. Using a unique firm survey conducted by the World Bank in six Eastern European countries during the 2008-2009 financial crisis, the paper shows that the drop in demand for firms'products and services was overwhelmingly reported as the most damaging adverse effect of the crisis. Other"usual suspects,"such as rising debt or reduced access to credit, are reported as minor. The paper also finds that the changes in firms'sales and installed capacity are significantly and robustly correlated with the demand sensitivity of the sector in which the firms operate. However, they are not robustly correlated with various proxies for firms'credit needs.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 6651.

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Date of creation: 01 Oct 2013
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6651

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Keywords: Economic Theory&Research; Microfinance; Access to Finance; Markets and Market Access; Banks&Banking Reform;

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  1. Hui Tong & Shang-Jin Wei, 2009. "The Composition Matters: Capital Inflows and Liquidity Crunch during a Global Economic Crisis," NBER Working Papers 15207, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Chudik, Alexander & Fratzscher, Marcel, 2011. "Identifying the global transmission of the 2007-09 financial crisis in a GVAR Model," Working Paper Series 1285, European Central Bank.
  3. Raddatz, Claudio, 2006. "Liquidity needs and vulnerability to financial underdevelopment," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(3), pages 677-722, June.
  4. Claessens, Stijn & Tong, Hui & Wei, Shang-Jin, 2012. "From the financial crisis to the real economy: Using firm-level data to identify transmission channels," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 375-387.
  5. Varvara Isyuk, 2012. "Financial versus Demand shocks in stock price returns of US non-financial firms in the crisis of 2007," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00755562, HAL.
  6. Atif Mian & Asim Ijaz Khwaja, 2006. "Tracing the Impact of Bank Liquidity Shocks: Evidence from an Emerging Market," NBER Working Papers 12612, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Vincenzo Quadrini & Fabrizio Perri, 2010. "International recessions," 2010 Meeting Papers 222, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  8. James Yetman & Michael B. Devereux, 2010. "leverage constraints and the international transmission of shocks," 2010 Meeting Papers 1341, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  9. Daniel Paravisini & Veronica Rappoport & Philipp Schnabl & Daniel Wolfenzon, 2011. "Dissecting the Effect of Credit Supply on Trade: Evidence from Matched Credit-Export Data," NBER Working Papers 16975, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Helbling, Thomas & Huidrom, Raju & Kose, M. Ayhan & Otrok, Christopher, 2011. "Do credit shocks matter? A global perspective," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 340-353, April.
  11. Chudik, Alexander & Fratzscher, Marcel, 2011. "Identifying the global transmission of the 2007-2009 financial crisis in a GVAR model," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 325-339, April.
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