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A model of gendered production in colonial Africa and implications for development in the post-colonial period

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  • Fofack, Hippolyte
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    Abstract

    This paper proposes a model to analyze the implications of colonial policies for gender inequality in Sub-Saharan Africa. The model emphasizes segmentation of production under complete specialization. It shows that the colonial production model, underpinned by occupational job segregation in the agricultural sector and gender bias in the non-agricultural sector, exacerbated gender inequality by limiting employment opportunities for women outside the realm of home production and subsistence agriculture. Over the past few decades, the resilience of parameters underlying these models of colonial production has heightened the risks of macroeconomic volatility in the region, especially where the structural transformation from low to high-value-added activities has remained elusive.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 6438.

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    Date of creation: 01 May 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6438

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    Keywords: Economic Theory&Research; Labor Policies; Rural Development Knowledge&Information Systems; Gender and Development; Population Policies;

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    1. Dornbusch, Rudiger & Fischer, Stanley & Samuelson, Paul A, 1977. "Comparative Advantage, Trade, and Payments in a Ricardian Model with a Continuum of Goods," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(5), pages 823-39, December.
    2. Galor, Oded & Weil, David, 1995. "The Gender Gap, Fertility and Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 1157, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Mina Baliamoune-Lutz, 2007. "Gender Inequality and Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa and Arab Countries," ICER Working Papers 25-2007, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.
    4. Bernard, Andrew B. & Bradford Jensen, J., 1999. "Exceptional exporter performance: cause, effect, or both?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 1-25, February.
    5. Hansen, Bent, 1979. "Colonial Economic Development with Unlimited Supply of Land: A Ricardian Case," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(4), pages 611-27, July.
    6. Darity, William Jr., 1995. "The formal structure of a gender-segregated low-income economy," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(11), pages 1963-1968, November.
    7. Lagerlof, Nils-Petter, 2003. " Gender Equality and Long-Run Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 403-26, December.
    8. Diane Elson, 1993. "Gender‐aware analysis and development economics," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 5(2), pages 237-247, 03.
    9. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2000. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," NBER Working Papers 7771, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Lundberg, Shelly & Pollak, Robert A, 1994. "Noncooperative Bargaining Models of Marriage," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 132-37, May.
    11. Valerie Lechene & Martin Browning, 2004. "Collective and unitary models: a clarification," Economics Series Working Papers 191, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    12. Agenor, Pierre-Richard & Canuto, Otaviano & da Silva, Luiz Pereira, 2010. "On gender and growth : the role of intergenerational health externalities and women's occupational constraints," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5492, The World Bank.
    13. Manser, Marilyn & Brown, Murray, 1980. "Marriage and Household Decision-Making: A Bargaining Analysis," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 21(1), pages 31-44, February.
    14. Warner, James M. & Campbell, D. A., 2000. "Supply Response in an Agrarian Economy with Non-Symmetric Gender Relations," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1327-1340, July.
    15. Anna Tibaijuka, 1994. "The Cost Of Differential Gender Roles In African Agriculture: A Case Study Of Smallholder Banana-Coffee Farms In The Kagera Region, Tanzania," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(1), pages 69-81.
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