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Universal health care and informal labor markets : the case of Thailand

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  • Wagstaff, Adam
  • Manachotphong, Wanwiphang

Abstract

This paper explores the possibility that universal health coverage may inadvertently result in distorted labor market choices, with workers preferring informal employment over formal employment, leading to negative effects on investment and growth, as well as reduced protection against non-health risks and the income risks associated with ill health. It explores this hypothesis in the context of the Thai universal coverage scheme, which was rolled out in four waves over a 12-month period starting in April 2001. It identifies the effects of universal coverage through the staggered rollout, and gains statistical power by using no less than 68 consecutive labor force surveys, each containing an average of 62,000 respondents. The analysis finds that universal coverage appears to have encouraged employment especially among married women, to have reduced formal-sector employment among married men but not among other groups, and to have increased informal-sector employment especially among married women. The largest positive informal-sector employment effects are found in the agricultural sector.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 6116.

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Date of creation: 01 Jul 2012
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6116

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Keywords: Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Labor Markets; Population Policies; Labor Policies; Access to Finance;

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  1. Pannarunothai, Supasit & Patmasiriwat, Direk & Srithamrongsawat, Samrit, 2004. "Universal health coverage in Thailand: ideas for reform and policy struggling," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 17-30, April.
  2. Aterido, Reyes & Hallward-Driemeier, Mary & Pages, Carmen, 2011. "Does expanding health insurance beyond formal-sector workers encourage informality ? measuring the impact of Mexico's Seguro Popular," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5785, The World Bank.
  3. Boonperm, Jirawan & Haughton, Jonathan & Khandker, Shahidur R. & Rukumnuaykit, Pungpond, 2012. "Appraising the Thailand village fund," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5998, The World Bank.
  4. Mariano Bosch & Raymundo M. Campos-Vázquez, 2010. "The trade-offs of social assistance programs in the labor market: The case of the “Seguro Popular” program in Mexico," Serie documentos de trabajo del Centro de Estudios Económicos 2010-12, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos.
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