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How vulnerable are Arab countries to global food price shocks ?

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Author Info

  • Ianchovichina, Elena
  • Loening, Josef
  • Wood, Christina

Abstract

This paper presents new estimates of pass-through coefficients from international to domestic food prices by country in the Middle East and North Africa. The estimates indicate that, despite the use of food price subsidies and other government interventions, a rise in global food prices is transmitted to a significant degree into domestic food prices in many countries in the Middle East and North Africa, although cross-country variation is significant. In nearly all countries, domestic food prices are highly downwardly rigid. The finding of asymmetric price transmission suggests that not only international food price levels matter, but also food price volatility. High food pass-through tends to increase inflation pressures, where food consumption shares are high. Domestic factors, often linked to storage, logistics, and procurement, have also played a major role in explaining high food inflation in the majority of countries in the region.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 6018.

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Date of creation: 01 Mar 2012
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6018

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Related research

Keywords: Food&Beverage Industry; Markets and Market Access; Emerging Markets; Currencies and Exchange Rates; Food Security;

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Cited by:
  1. Ansgar Belke & Christian Dreger, 2013. "The Transmission of Oil and Food Prices to Consumer Prices: Evidence for the MENA Countries," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1332, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  2. Maystadt, Jean-François & Trinh Tan, Jean-François & Breisinger, Clemens, 2014. "Does food security matter for transition in Arab countries?," Food Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 106-115.
  3. Kornher, Lukas & Kalkuhl, Matthias, 2013. "Food price volatility in developing countries and its determinants," 53rd Annual Conference, Berlin, Germany, September 25-27, 2013, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA) 156132, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
  4. Basher, Syed Abul & Raboy, David G. & Kaitibie, Simeon & Hossain, Ishrat, 2012. "The economics of food security in Arab micro states: preliminary evidence from micro data," MPRA Paper 39357, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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