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Determinants and dynamics of schooling and child labor in Bolivia

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  • Grigoli, Francesco
  • Sbrana, Giacomo

Abstract

This paper investigates the determinants of primary school enrollment, attendance and child labor in Bolivia from 1999 to 2007. The analysis also aims at identifying the substitution and complementary relationships between schooling and working. Although enrollment rates show a significant improvement, lack of attendance remains an issue. The empirical results reveal that the increase in enrollment is led by indigenous children and those living in urban areas. Moreover, contrary to common belief, being extremely poor and indigenous are the main determinants of school attendance. Although extremely poor children increased their school attendance, they were not able to reduce child labor. However, for indigenous children school attendance and child labor were substitutes, increasing schooling and reducing child labor.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 5534.

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Date of creation: 01 Jan 2011
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5534

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Related research

Keywords: Street Children; Primary Education; Education For All; Youth and Governance; Children and Youth;

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  1. Al-Samarrai, Samer, 2002. "Achieving education for all: How much does money matter?," MPRA Paper 118, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Van de Ven, Wynand P. M. M. & Van Praag, Bernard M. S., 1981. "The demand for deductibles in private health insurance : A probit model with sample selection," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 229-252, November.
  3. Al-Samarrai, Samer & Peasgood, Tessa, 1998. "Educational attainments and household characteristics in Tanzania," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 395-417, October.
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Cited by:
  1. Diego A. Vera Cossio, 2011. "Enrollment and child labor in Bolivia," Development Research Working Paper Series 11/2011, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.
  2. Bredl, Sebastian, 2012. "Child Quality and Child Quantity: Evidence from Bolivian Household Surveys," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 62065, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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