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Evaluation in the practice of development

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  • Ravallion, Martin

Abstract

Knowledge about development effectiveness is constrained by two factors. First, the project staff in governments and international agencies who decide how much to invest in research on specific interventions are often not well informed about the returns to rigorous evaluation and (even when they are)cannot be expected to take full account of the external benefits to others from new knowledge. This leads to under-investment in evaluative research. Second, while standard methods of impact evaluation are useful, they often leave many questions about development effectiveness unanswered. The paper proposes ten steps for making evaluations more relevant to the needs of practitioners. It is argued that more attention needs to be given to identifying policy-relevant questions (including the case for intervention); that a broader approach should be taken to the problems of internal validity; and that the problems of external validity (including scaling up) merit more attention.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 4547.

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Date of creation: 01 Mar 2008
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4547

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Related research

Keywords: Poverty Monitoring&Analysis; Science Education; Scientific Research&Science Parks; Population Policies; Tertiary Education;

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Cited by:
  1. Holzmann, Robert, 2010. "Bringing Financial Literacy and Education to Low and Middle Income Countries: The Need to Review, Adjust, and Extend Current Wisdom," IZA Discussion Papers 5114, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Cadot, Olivier & Fernandes, Ana M. & Gourdon, Julien & Mattoo, Aaditya, 2012. "Are the benefits of export support durable ? evidence from Tunisia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6295, The World Bank.
  3. Global Donor Platform for Rural Development & World Bank & Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 2008. "Tracking Results in Agriculture and Rural Development in Less-Than-Ideal Conditions : A Sourcebook of Indicators for Monitoring and Evaluation," World Bank Other Operational Studies 6200, The World Bank.
  4. Global Donor Platform for Rural Development & World Bank & FAO Statistics Division, 2008. "Tracking Results in Agriculture and Rural Development in Less-Than-Ideal Conditions : A Sourcebook of Indicators for Monitoring and Evaluation," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7852, The World Bank.
  5. Martin Ravallion, 2012. "Fighting Poverty One Experiment at a Time: Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty : Review Essay," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(1), pages 103-14, March.
  6. Lin, Justin Yifu & Monga, Celestin, 2010. "The growth report and new structural economics," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5336, The World Bank.
  7. Elbers, Chris & Gunning, Jan Willem, 2013. "Evaluation of development programs : randomized controlled trials or regressions ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6587, The World Bank.
  8. de Hoop, Jacobus & Rosati, Furio C., 2013. "Cash Transfers and Child Labour," IZA Discussion Papers 7496, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Thi Minh-Phuong Ngo & Zaki Wahhaj, 2010. "Microfinance and Gender Empowerment," CSAE Working Paper Series 2010-34, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  10. Rodrik, Dani, 2008. "The New Development Economics: We Shall Experiment, but How Shall We Learn?," Working Paper Series rwp08-055, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  11. Independent Evaluation Group, 2012. "World Bank Group Impact Evaluations : Relevance and Effectiveness," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13100, October.
  12. repec:dgr:uvatin:2009073 is not listed on IDEAS
  13. repec:dgr:uvatin:2012081 is not listed on IDEAS

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