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Explaining U.S. immigration, 1971-98

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  • Clark, Ximena
  • Hatton, Timothy J.
  • Williamson, Jeffrey G.

Abstract

The authors develop and estimate a model explaining the level and country-source composition of United States immigration since the early 1970s. The model incorporates ratios of source country income, education, and demographic structure, as well as relative inequality. The authors'model also incorporates both network effects, as reflected in the stock of previous immigrants, and various controls for immigration quota policy. The model is estimated on a panel of 81 source countries for 1971-98. The results strongly support the influence of economic, demographic, and geographic variables as well as policy. The regression results are used to identify those factors that most influenced the changing composition of U.S. immigration by source.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 3252.

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Date of creation: 01 Mar 2004
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3252

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Related research

Keywords: Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Public Health Promotion; Voluntary and Involuntary Resettlement; Human Migrations&Resettlements; Gender and Social Development; Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Voluntary and Involuntary Resettlement; Human Migrations&Resettlements; Gender and Social Development; Economic Theory&Research;

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References

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  1. George J. Borjas, 1993. "Immigration Policy, National Origin, and Immigrant Skills: A Comparison of Canada and the United States," NBER Chapters, in: Small Differences That Matter: Labor Markets and Income Maintenance in Canada and the United States, pages 21-44 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Borjas, George J, 1987. "Self-Selection and the Earnings of Immigrants," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(4), pages 531-53, September.
  3. David Karemera & Victor Iwuagwu Oguledo & Bobby Davis, 2000. "A gravity model analysis of international migration to North America," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(13), pages 1745-1755.
  4. Guillermina Jasso & Mark R. Rosenzweig & James P. Smith, 1998. "The Changing Skills of New Immigrants to the United States: Recent Trends and Their Determinants," NBER Working Papers 6764, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Heather Antecol & Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & Stephen J. Trejo, . "Immigration Policy and the Skills of Immigrants to Australia, Canada, and the United States," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2001-26, Claremont Colleges.
  6. Chiswick, Barry R., 2000. "Are Immigrants Favorably Self-Selected? An Economic Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 131, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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Cited by:
  1. Bertoli, Simone & Fernández-Huertas Moraga, Jesús, 2011. "Multilateral Resistance to Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 5958, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Nicole B. Simpson & Chad Sparber, 2012. "The Short- and Long-Run Determinants of Less- Educated Immigrant Flows into U.S. States," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1226, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  3. Bertoli, Simone & Fernández-Huertas Moraga, Jesús & Ortega, Francesc, 2010. "Crossing the Border: Self-Selection, Earnings and Individual Migration Decisions," IZA Discussion Papers 4957, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Simpson, Nicole B. & Sparber, Chad, 2012. "The Short- and Long-Run Determinants of Less-Educated Immigration into U.S. States," IZA Discussion Papers 6437, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Kato, Takao & Sparber, Chad, 2010. "Quotas and Quality: The Effect of H-1B Visa Restrictions on the Pool of Prospective Undergraduate Students from Abroad," IZA Discussion Papers 4951, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Alicia Adsera & Mariola Pytlikova, 2012. "The role of language in shaping international migration," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1206, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.

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