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Gender, generations, and nonfarm participation

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  • Emran, M. Shabe
  • Otsuka, Misuzu
  • Shilpi, Forhad

Abstract

The authors present an empirical analysis of intergenerational links in nonfarm participation with a focus on gender effects. Using survey data from Nepal, the evidence shows that the mother exerts a strong influence on a daughter's employment choice. Having a mother in a nonfarm sector raises a daughter's probability of nonfarm participation by 200 percent. The effects are truly dramatic for skilled nonfarm jobs. Having a mother in a skilled job raises a daughter's probability by 1,200 percent. Having a father in a nonfarm sector, on the other hand, does not have any significant effect on a son's probability of nonfarm participation when the endogeneity of education and assets is corrected for by the two-stage conditional maximum likelihood approach. But a moderate positive intergenerational correlation between fathers and sons exists for skilled jobs.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 3087.

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Date of creation: 30 Jun 2003
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3087

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Keywords: Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Public Health Promotion; Economic Theory&Research; Decentralization; Health Economics&Finance; Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Economic Theory&Research; Health Economics&Finance; Environmental Economics&Policies; Teaching and Learning;

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  21. repec:fth:iniesr:539 is not listed on IDEAS
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Cited by:
  1. Pham, Hung T, 2006. "Rural Nonfarm Employment Under Trade Reform Evidence From Vietnam, 1993-2002," MPRA Paper 6476, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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