Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The impact of urban spatial structure on travel demand in the United States

Contents:

Author Info

  • Bento, Antonio M.
  • Cropper, Maureen L.
  • Mobarak, Ahmed Mushfiq
  • Vinha, Katja

Abstract

The authors combine measures of urban form and public transit supply for 114 urbanized areas with the 1990 Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey to address two questions: (1) How do measures of urban form, including city shape, road density, the spatial distribution of population, and jobs-housing balance affect the annual miles driven and commute mode choices of U.S. households? (2) How does the supply of public transportation (annual route miles supplied and availability of transit stops) affect miles driven and commute mode choice? The authors find that jobs-housing balance, population centrality, and rail miles supplied significantly reduce the probability of driving to work in cities with some rail transit. Population centrality and jobs-housing balance have a significant impact on annual household vehicle miles traveled (VMT), as do city shape, road density, and (in rail cities) annual rail route miles supplied. The elasticity of VMT with respect to each variable is small, on the order of 0.10-0.20 in absolute value. However, changing several measures of form simultaneously can reduce annual VMT significantly. Moving the sample households from a city with the characteristics of Atlanta to a city with the characteristics of Boston reduces annual VMT by 25 percent.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/servlet/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2003/04/23/000094946_03040404262857/Rendered/PDF/multi0page.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 3007.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 31 Mar 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3007

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
Phone: (202) 477-1234
Email:
Web page: http://www.worldbank.org/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Housing&Human Habitats; Roads&Highways; Environmental Economics&Policies; Economic Theory&Research; Transport Economics Policy&Planning; Economic Theory&Research; Roads&Highways; Transport Economics Policy&Planning; Geographical Information Systems; Housing&Human Habitats;

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Peter Mieszkowski & Edwin S. Mills, 1993. "The Causes of Metropolitan Suburbanization," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 135-147, Summer.
  2. Edward L. Glaeser & Matthew E. Kahn, 2001. "Decentralized Employment and the Transformation of the American City," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research 1912, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  3. Parry, Ian & Small, Kenneth, 2002. "Does Britain or the United States Have the Right Gasoline Tax?," Discussion Papers, Resources For the Future dp-02-12-, Resources For the Future.
  4. Giuliano, Genevieve & Small, Kenneth A., 1993. "Is the Journey to Work Explained by Urban Structure?," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt2ss7x5b1, University of California Transportation Center.
  5. David Levinson & Ajay Kumar, 1997. "Density and the Journey to Work," Working Papers, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group 199701, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
  6. Baum-Snow, Nathaniel & Kahn, Matthew E., 2000. "The effects of new public projects to expand urban rail transit," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 241-263, August.
  7. McFadden, Daniel, 1974. "The measurement of urban travel demand," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 303-328, November.
  8. Dubin, Jeffrey A & McFadden, Daniel L, 1984. "An Econometric Analysis of Residential Electric Appliance Holdings and Consumption," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 52(2), pages 345-62, March.
  9. Mills, Edwin S., 1992. "The measurement and determinants of suburbanization," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 377-387, November.
  10. Wheaton, William C., 1998. "Land Use and Density in Cities with Congestion," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 258-272, March.
  11. Train, Kenneth, 1980. "A Structured Logit Model of Auto Ownership and Mode Choice," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(2), pages 357-70, January.
  12. Puller, Steven L. & Greening, Lorna A., 1999. "Household adjustment to gasoline price change: an analysis using 9 years of US survey data," Energy Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 37-52, February.
  13. Boarnet, Marlon & Crane, Randall, 2001. "The influence of land use on travel behavior: specification and estimation strategies," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 823-845, November.
  14. Fred Mannering & Clifford Winston, 1985. "A Dynamic Empirical Analysis of Household Vehicle Ownership and Utilization," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 16(2), pages 215-236, Summer.
  15. McDonald, John F., 1989. "Econometric studies of urban population density: A survey," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 361-385, November.
  16. Lave, Charles A, 1970. "The Demand for Urban Mass Transportation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 52(3), pages 320-23, August.
  17. Stephen Malpezzi, 1999. "Estimates of the Measurement and Determinants of Urban Sprawl in U.S. Metropolitan Areas," Wisconsin-Madison CULER working papers, University of Wisconsin Center for Urban Land Economic Research 99-06, University of Wisconsin Center for Urban Land Economic Research.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Nelson, Peter & Baglino, Andrew & Harrington, Winston & Safirova, Elena & Lipman, Abram, 2007. "Transit in Washington, DC: Current benefits and optimal level of provision," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 231-251, September.
  2. Fang, Hao Audrey, 2008. "A discrete-continuous model of households' vehicle choice and usage, with an application to the effects of residential density," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 42(9), pages 736-758, November.
  3. Colin Vance & Ralf Hedel, 2006. "On the Link between Urban Form and Automobile Use - Evidence from German Survey Data," RWI Discussion Papers, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung 0048, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung.
  4. Bento, Antonio M. & Franco, Sofia F. & Kaffine, Daniel, 2011. "Is there a double-dividend from anti-sprawl policies?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 135-152, March.
  5. Kim, Jinwon & Brownstone, David, 2013. "The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Fuel Consumption: Evidence from National Samples," MPRA Paper 47785, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Peter Gordon & Bumsoo Lee, 2003. "Settlement Patterns in the U.S. Canada:Simliarities and Differences - Policies or Preferences?," Working Paper, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate 8605, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
  7. Reid Ewing & Harry W. Richardson & Keith Bartholomew & Arthur C. Nelson & Chang-Hee Christine Bae, 2014. "Compactness vs. Sprawl Revisited: Converging Views," CESifo Working Paper Series 4571, CESifo Group Munich.
  8. Naveen Eluru & Chandra Bhat & Ram Pendyala & Karthik Konduri, 2010. "A joint flexible econometric model system of household residential location and vehicle fleet composition/usage choices," Transportation, Springer, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 603-626, July.
  9. Colin Vance & Ralf Hedel, 2007. "The impact of urban form on automobile travel: disentangling causation from correlation," Transportation, Springer, Springer, vol. 34(5), pages 575-588, September.
  10. Seyed Amir H. Zahabi & Luis Miranda-Moreno & Zachary Patterson & Philippe Barla, 2013. "Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Car Distance Greenhouse Gases and the Effect of Built Environment: a Latent Class Regression Analysis," Cahiers de recherche CREATE, CREATE 2013-1, CREATE.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3007. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Roula I. Yazigi).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.