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How inadequate provision of public infrastructure and services affects private investment

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  • Reinikka, Ritva
  • Svensson, Jakob

Abstract

Lack of private investment is a serious policy problem in many developing countries, especially in Africa. Despite recent structural reform and stabilization, the investment response to date has been mixed, even among the strongest reformers. The role of poor infrastructure and deficient public services has received little attention in the economic literature, where the effect of public spending and investment on growth is shown to be at best ambiguous. The authors use unique microeconomic evidence to show the effects of poor infrastructure services on private investment in Uganda. They find that poor public capital, proxied by an unreliable and inadequate power supply, significantly reduces productive private investment. Firms ca substitute for inadequate provision of public capital by investing in it themselves. This comes at a cost, however: the installation of less productive capital. These results have clear policy implications. Although macroeconomic reforms and stabilization are necessary conditions for sustained growth and private investment, without an accompanying improvement in the public sector's performance, the private supply response to macroeconomic policy reform is likely to remain limited.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 2262.

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Date of creation: 31 Dec 1999
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:2262

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Keywords: Economic Theory&Research; Banks&Banking Reform; Environmental Economics&Policies; International Terrorism&Counterterrorism; ICT Policy and Strategies;

References

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  1. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," NBER Working Papers 3120, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Easterly, William & Rebelo, Sergio, 1993. "Fiscal policy and economic growth: An empirical investigation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 417-458, December.
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  4. Francis Teal & Stefan Dercon & Måns Söderbom, 1997. "Investment in Africa`s manufacturing sector: a four-country panel data analysis," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/1997-11, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  5. Devarajan, Shantayanan & Swaroop, Vinaya & Heng-fu, Zou, 1996. "The composition of public expenditure and economic growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 313-344, April.
  6. Reinikka, Ritva & Svensson, Jakob, 1999. "Confronting competition - investment response and constraints in Uganda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2242, The World Bank.
  7. Easterly, William & Levine, Ross, 1997. "Africa's Growth Tragedy: Policies and Ethnic Divisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1203-50, November.
  8. Paul Collier & Jan Willem Gunning, 1997. "Explaining African economic performance," CSAE Working Paper Series 1997-02.2, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Fedderke, J.W. & Bogetic, Z., 2009. "Infrastructure and Growth in South Africa: Direct and Indirect Productivity Impacts of 19 Infrastructure Measures," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 1522-1539, September.
  2. Bigsten, Arne & Levin, Jorgen & Persson, Hakan, 2001. "Debt Relief and Growth: A study of Zambia and Tanzania," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  3. Causa, Orsetta & Cohen, Daniel, 2006. "Industrial Productivity in 51 Countries, Rich and Poor," CEPR Discussion Papers 5549, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Carlos Aparicio & Miguel A. Jaramillo & Cristina San Román, 2011. "Desarrollo de la infraestructura y reducción de la pobreza: el caso peruano," Working Papers 11-00, Departamento de Economía, Universidad del Pacífico, revised Sep 2011.
  5. Bogetic, Zeljko & Fedderke, Johannes W., 2006. "Forecasting investment needs in South Africa's electricity and telecommunications sectors," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3829, The World Bank.
  6. Esther K. Ishengoma & Robert Kappel, 2008. "Business Constraints and Growth Potential of Micro and Small Manufacturing Enterprises in Uganda," GIGA Working Paper Series 78, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
  7. Pargal, Sheoli, 2003. "Regulation and private sector investment in infrastructure - evidence from Latin America," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3037, The World Bank.
  8. Leonce Ndikumana, 2008. "Can macroeconomic policy stimulate private investment in South Africa? New insights from aggregate and manufacturing sector-level evidence," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(7), pages 869-887.
  9. Stephen S. Everhart & Mariusz A. Sumlinski, 2001. "Trends in Private Investment in Developing Countries : Statistics for 1970-2000 and the Impact on Private Investment of Corruption and the Quality of Public Investment," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13989, January.
  10. Lin, Justin Yifu & Doemeland, Doerte, 2012. "Beyond Keynesianism : global infrastructure investments in times of crisis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5940, The World Bank.
  11. Li, Xiaoying & Liu, Xiaming, 2005. "Foreign Direct Investment and Economic Growth: An Increasingly Endogenous Relationship," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 393-407, March.
  12. Calderon, Cesar & Serven, Luis, 2008. "Infrastructure and economic development in Sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4712, The World Bank.
  13. Gunasekera, Kumudu & Anderson, William & Lakshmanan, T.R., 2008. "Highway-Induced Development: Evidence from Sri Lanka," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 2371-2389, November.
  14. Mila Freire & Mario Polèse & Pamela Echeverria, 2003. "Connecting Cities with Macroeconomic Concerns : The Missing Link," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15058, January.
  15. J. Luis Guasch, 2004. "Granting and Renegotiating Infrastructure Concessions : Doing it Right," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15024, January.
  16. Anthony Bende-Nabende & Jim Slater, 2003. "Private capital formation: Short- and long-run crowding-in (out) effects in ASEAN, 1971-99," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 3(28), pages 1-16.
  17. Janvier Nkurunziza & Floribert Ngaruko, 2002. "Explaining Growth in Burundi: 1960-2000," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/2002-03, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  18. Lin, Justin Yifu, 2013. "Global infrastructure initiative and global recovery," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 400-411.

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