Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Granger non-causality tests between (non)renewable energy consumption and output in Italy since 1861: the (ir)relevance of structural breaks

Contents:

Author Info

  • Andrea Vaona

    ()
    (Department of Economics (University of Verona))

Abstract

The present paper considers an Italian dataset with an annual frequency from 1861 to 2000. It implements Granger non-causality tests between energy consumption and output contrasting methods allowing for structural change with those imposing parameter stability throughout the sample. Though some econometric details can differ, results have clear policy implications. Energy conservation policies are likely to hasten an underlying tendency of the economy towards a more efficient use of fossil fuels. The abandonment of traditional energy carriers was a positive change.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://dse.univr.it//workingpapers/Energyconsumptionandoutput29_6_11b.pdf
File Function: First version
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Verona, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 19/2010.

as in new window
Length: 0
Date of creation: Dec 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ver:wpaper:19/2010

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Vicolo Campofiore, 2 - I-37129 Verona
Phone: +390458028097
Fax: +390458028486
Email:
Web page: http://www.dse.univr.it
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: renewable energy; non-renewable energy; real GDP; Granger-causality; cointegration;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Zapata, Hector O. & Rambaldi, Alicia N., 1996. "Monte Carlo Evidence On Cointegration And Causation," Staff Papers 31690, Louisiana State University, Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness.
  2. Toda, Hiro Y. & Yamamoto, Taku, 1995. "Statistical inference in vector autoregressions with possibly integrated processes," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1-2), pages 225-250.
  3. Apergis, Nicholas & Payne, James E., 2010. "Renewable energy consumption and growth in Eurasia," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1392-1397, November.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Casuality between Energy and Output in the Long-Run
    by David Stern in Stochastic Trend on 2013-01-21 00:51:00
Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Paresh Narayan & Russell Smyth, 2014. "Applied Econometrics and a Decade of Energy Economics Research," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series 21-14, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  2. Bruns, Stephan B. & Gross, Christian & Stern, David I., 2013. "Is There Really Granger Causality Between Energy Use and Output?," FCN Working Papers 11/2013, E.ON Energy Research Center, Future Energy Consumer Needs and Behavior (FCN).
  3. Magnani, Natalia & Vaona, Andrea, 2013. "Regional spillover effects of renewable energy generation in Italy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 663-671.
  4. Stern, David & Enflo, Kerstin, 2013. "Causality Between Energy and Output in the Long-Run," Lund Papers in Economic History 126, Department of Economic History, Lund University.
  5. Bruns, Stephan B. & Gross, Christian, 2013. "What if Energy Time Series are not Independent? Implications for Energy-GDP Causality Analysis," FCN Working Papers 10/2013, E.ON Energy Research Center, Future Energy Consumer Needs and Behavior (FCN).
  6. Muhammad, Shahbaz & Muhammad, Zeshan & Talat, Afza, 2012. "Is energy consumption effective to spur economic growth in Pakistan? new evidence from bounds test to level relationships and Granger causality tests," MPRA Paper 39734, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 29 Jun 2012.
  7. Sebri, Maamar, 2014. "Use renewables to be cleaner: Meta-analysis of the renewable energy consumption-economic growth nexus," MPRA Paper 53247, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Andrea Vaona, 2012. "The sclerosis of regional electricity intensities in Italy: an aggregate and sectoral analysis," Working Papers 18/2012, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
  9. David I. Stern, 2011. "From Correlation to Granger Causality," Crawford School Research Papers 1113, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  10. Mohammed I Shuaibu & Mutiu A Oyinlola, 2013. "Do structural breaks matter in the growth-environment nexus in Nigeria?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(4), pages 2982-2994.
  11. Hanan Naser, 2014. "Oil Market, Nuclear Energy Consumption and Economic Growth: Evidence from Emerging Economies," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 4(2), pages 288-296.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ver:wpaper:19/2010. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael Reiter).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.