Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The Economics of Cloud Computing

Contents:

Author Info

  • Ergin Bayrak

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Southern California)

  • John Conley

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Vanderbilt University)

  • Simon Wilkie

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Southern California)

Abstract

Cloud computing brings together several existing technologies including service oriented architecture, distributed grid computing, virtualization, and broadband networking to provide software, infrastructure, and platforms as services. Under the old IT model, companies built their own server farms designed to meet peak demand using bundled hardware and software solutions. This was time consuming, capital intensive and relatively inflexible. Under the cloud computing model, firms can rent as many virtual machines as they need at any given time, and then either design or use off-the-shelf solutions to integrate company-wide data in order to easily distribute access to users both within and outside of the company firewall. This converts fixed capital costs into variable costs, prevents under and over provisioning, and allows minute by minute flexibly. Consumers are also increasingly turning to the cloud for computing service through such applications as Gmail, Pandora, and Facebook. The purpose of this paper is to discuss this new and transformative technology, survey the existing economics literature on the subject, and suggest potential directions for new research.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/pubs/VUECON/vu11-w18.pdf
File Function: First version, September 2011
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Vanderbilt University Department of Economics in its series Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers with number 1118.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Sep 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:van:wpaper:1118

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/econ/wparchive/index.html

Related research

Keywords: Cloud Computing; SaaS; PaaS. IaaS; Economics. Information Technology;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. John P. Conley & Fan-Chin Kung, 2010. "Private Benefits, Warm Glow, and Reputation in the Free and Open Source Software Production Model," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 12(4), pages 665-689, 08.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:van:wpaper:1118. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (John P. Conley).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.