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Precocious British Industrialization: A General Equilibrium Perspective

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Paper provided by University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics in its series UWO Department of Economics Working Papers with number 200213.

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Date of creation: 2002
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Handle: RePEc:uwo:uwowop:200213

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Postal: Department of Economics, Reference Centre, Social Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 5C2
Phone: 519-661-2111 Ext.85244
Web page: http://economics.uwo.ca/research/research_papers/department_working_papers.html

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  1. Cohen, Jon S. & Weitzman, Martin L., 1975. "A Marxian model of enclosures," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(4), pages 287-336, November.
  2. Harley, C. Knick & Crafts, N.F.R., 2000. "Simulating the Two Views of the British Industrial Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 60(03), pages 819-841, September.
  3. Horrell, Sara, 1996. "Home Demand and British Industrialization," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 56(03), pages 561-604, September.
  4. Irwin, Douglas A, 1988. "Welfare Effects of British Free Trade: Debate and Evidence from the 1840s," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(6), pages 1142-64, December.
  5. Robert C. Allen, 1999. "Tracking the agricultural revolution in England," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 52(2), pages 209-235, 05.
  6. Patrick Karl O'Brien, 1996. "Path dependency, or why Britain became an industrialized and urbanized economy long before France," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 49(2), pages 213-249, 05.
  7. Allen, Robert C., 2000. "Economic structure and agricultural productivity in Europe, 1300 1800," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(01), pages 1-25, April.
  8. McCloskey, Donald N., 1980. "Magnanimous albion: Free trade and British national income, 1841-1881," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 303-320, July.
  9. N. F. R. Crafts & C. K. Harley, 1992. "Output growth and the British industrial revolution: a restatement of the Crafts-Harley view," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 45(4), pages 703-730, November.
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Cited by:
  1. McCloskey, Deirdre, 2009. "Foreign Trade Was Not an Engine of Growth," MPRA Paper 19723, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. repec:cge:warwcg:76 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. McCloskey, Deirdre, 2009. "Growth, Quality, Happiness, and the Poor," MPRA Paper 17967, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Legros, Patrick & Newman, Andrew F & Proto, Eugenio, 2012. "Smithian Growth Through Creative Organization," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 981, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  5. Robert Allen & Robert C. Allen, 2007. "Engel`s Pause: A Pessimist`s Guide to the British Industrial Revolution," Economics Series Working Papers 315, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  6. Gregory Clark, 2006. "What made Britannia great? Did the Industrial Revolution make Britain a World Power?," Working Papers 618, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
  7. Legros, Patrick & Newman, Andrew F & Proto, Eugenio, 2012. "Smithian Growth Through Creative Organization," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 77, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
  8. Knick Harley, 2003. "Growth Theory and Industrial Revolutions in Britain and America," Discussion Papers 03-32, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  9. Tim Leunig, 2011. "Cart or Horse: Transport and Economic Growth," International Transport Forum Discussion Papers 2011/4, OECD Publishing.
  10. Robert C. Allen, 2005. "Capital Accumulation, Technological Change, and the Distribution of Income during the British Industrial Revolution," Economics Series Working Papers 239, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  11. C. Knick Harley, 2013. "British and European Industrialization," Economics Series Working Papers Number 111, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  12. McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen, 2009. "Britain, China, and the Irrelevance of Stage Theories," MPRA Paper 18291, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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