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Bribing Behaviour and Sample Selection: Evidence from Post-Socialist countries and Western Europe

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Author Info

  • Timothy Hinks

    ()
    (University of the West of England, Bristol)

  • Artjoms Ivlevs

    (University of the West of England, Bristol)

Abstract

We study the individual-level determinants of bribing public officials. Particular attention is paid to the issue of respondents’ non-random selection into contact with public officials, which may result in biased estimates. Data come from the 2010 Life in Transition Survey, covering 30 post-socialist and five Western European countries. The Heckman probit model results suggest that the elderly are less likely to bribe public officials, while linguistic minorities, people with higher perceived relative income and those with lower trust in public institutions are more likely to bribe. The results also show that not accounting for sample selection effects produces an upward bias in estimated coefficients.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol in its series Working Papers with number 20121208.

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Date of creation: 08 Jan 2012
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Handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:20121208

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Postal: Frenchay Campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY
Phone: 0117 328 3610
Web page: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/bl/research/bristoleconomics.aspx
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Related research

Keywords: Bribing; Sample Selection; Transition economies;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Timothy Hinks & Artjoms Ivlevs, 2014. "Communist party membership and bribe paying in transitional economies," Working Papers 20141401, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.

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