Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

In China's Wake: Has Asia Gained From China's Growth?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Peter E Robertson

    (UWA Business School, The University of Western Australia)

  • Jessica Y Xu

    (Australian Government, The Treasury)

Abstract

China’s growth has been rapid but the value of China's international trade has grown even faster. This trade-biased growth is bringing both challenges and opportunities for Asian economies that are highly integrated with Chinese trade networks. Moreover in ASEAN countries such as Indonesia and Malaysia, China’s success has been seen as a threat to its existing trade and manufacturing base. We use an historical simulation analysis to examine the impacts of China’s growth on Asian economies. We find that a decade of China’s growth has raised GDP per capita in the developed Asian economies by around 16%. The effect on the ASEAN-4 economies is not as strong but still large, the GDP of the ASEAN-4 economies increased by approximately 7%. The main source of these gains is found to be lower durable goods import costs which induce accumulation of machinery and equipment capital.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.business.uwa.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/1082606/10-15_In_Chinas_Wake-Has_Asia_Gained_from_Chinas_Growth.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics in its series Economics Discussion / Working Papers with number 10-15.

as in new window
Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uwa:wpaper:10-15

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, W.A. 6009
Phone: (08) 9380 2918
Fax: (08) 9380 1016
Web page: http://www.business.uwa.edu.au/school/disciplines/economics
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Economic Growth; China; Trade Costs;

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Prema-chandra Athukorala, 2007. "The Rise of China and East Asian Export Performance: Is the Crowding-out Fear Warranted?," Departmental Working Papers 2007-10, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
  2. Alan Ahearne & John Fernald & Prakash Loungani & John Schindler, 2003. "China and emerging Asia: comrades or competitors?," Working Paper Series WP-03-27, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  3. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2004. "Trade Costs," NBER Working Papers 10480, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Coxhead, Ian, 2007. "A New Resource Curse? Impacts of China's Boom on Comparative Advantage and Resource Dependence in Southeast Asia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(7), pages 1099-1119, July.
  5. Baier, Scott L. & Bergstrand, Jeffrey H., 2001. "The growth of world trade: tariffs, transport costs, and income similarity," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 1-27, February.
  6. Barry Eichengreen & Yeongseop Rhee & Hui Tong, 2007. "China and the Exports of Other Asian Countries," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 143(2), pages 201-226, July.
  7. Harris, Richard G. & Robertson, Peter E., 2013. "Trade, wages and skill accumulation in the emerging giants," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(2), pages 407-421.
  8. Lee Branstetter & Nicholas Lardy, 2006. "China's Embrace of Globalization," NBER Working Papers 12373, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. David Roland-Holst & John Weiss, 2005. "People's Republic of China and its Neighbours: evidence on regional trade and investment effects," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 19, pages 18-35, November.
  10. Alessia Amighini, 2005. "China in the international fragmentation of production: Evidence from the ICT industry," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 2(2), pages 203-219, December.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Rod Tyers, 2011. "Japanese Economic Stagnation: Causes And Global Implications," CAMA Working Papers 2011-20, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  2. Rod Tyers & Jenny Corbett, 2011. "Japan's Economic Slowdown and its Global Implications: A Review of the Economic Modelling," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 11-19, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  3. Rod Tyers & Ying Zhang, 2011. "Japan's Economic Recovery: Insights from Multi-Region Dynamics," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 11-13, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  4. Rod Tyers, 2012. "The Rise and Robustness of Economic Freedom in China," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 12-02, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uwa:wpaper:10-15. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Shane Standley).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.