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Learning and Adaptation as a Source of Market Failure

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    Abstract

    In the developed model, without knowing the trading strategies of the other traders in a financial market, traders cannot derive a rational expectations equilibrium. In a dynamic setting, market participants employ learning and adaptation to develop trading strategies to accommodate for this information de ficiency. Model-consistent use of market-based information generally improves price performance. It can also produce episodes of extreme sudden mispricing despite model generated historical support for its use. Simulations examine the impact of information constraints and bounded rationality on general price efficiency and sudden market mispricing.

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    File URL: http://www.uts.edu.au/sites/default/files/edg_wp14.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Economics Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney in its series Working Paper Series with number 14.

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    Length: 37
    Date of creation: 01 Aug 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:uts:ecowps:14

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    Keywords: Heterogeneous Agents; Efficient Markets; Learning; Dynamics; Computational Economics; Market Failure;

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