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Increasing the Economic Development Benefits of Higher Education in Michigan

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Abstract

This paper considers how a state such as Michigan can increase the economic development benefits of higher education. Research evidence suggests that higher education increases local economic development principally by increasing the quality of the local workforce, and secondarily by increasing local innovative ideas. These economic development benefits of higher education can be increased by: 1) competent management of conventional economic development programs that focus on business attraction and retention; 2) policies that focus on increasing local job skills by educating the state's residents, as opposed to attracting in-migrants; 3) policies that address specific "market failures" in how higher education leads to increased workforce quality or business innovations.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research in its series Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles with number tjb2005jwd.

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Handle: RePEc:upj:weupjo:tjb2005jwd

Note: Appears in Journal of Workforce Development 1(1): 19-28
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Keywords: local economic development; higher education; returns to education;

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References

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  1. Enrico Moretti, 2003. "Human Capital Externalities in Cities," NBER Working Papers 9641, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Timothy J. Bartik, 2003. "Local Economic Development Policies," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 03-91, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  3. Timothy J. Bartik, 1991. "Who Benefits from State and Local Economic Development Policies?," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number wbsle.
  4. Timothy J. Bartik & Peter K. Eisinger & George A. Erickcek, 2003. "Economic Development Policy in Michigan," Book chapters authored by Upjohn Institute researchers, in: Charles L. Ballard & Paul N. courant & Douglas C. Drake & Ronald C. Fisher & Elisabeth R. Gerber (ed.), Michigan at the Millennium: A Benchmark and Analysis of Its Fiscal and Economic Structure, pages 279-297 W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  5. Ronald S. Jarmin, 1999. "Evaluating the impact of manufacturing extension on productivity growth," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(1), pages 99-119.
  6. Enrico Moretti, 2002. "Estimating the Social Return to Higher Education: Evidence From Longitudinal and Repeated Cross-Sectional Data," NBER Working Papers 9108, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Edward L. Glaeser & Albert Saiz, 2003. "The rise of the skilled city," Working Papers 04-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  8. Timothy J. Bartik, 2001. "Jobs for the Poor: Can Labor Demand Policies Help?," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number tjb2001.
  9. Harry J. Holzer & Richard Block & Marcus Cheatham & Jack H. Knott, 1993. "Are training subsidies for firms effective? The Michigan experience," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 46(4), pages 625-636, July.
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Cited by:
  1. Terance J. Rephann, 2008. "Community Colleges and Local Economic Development," Working Papers 2008-02, Center for Economic and Policy Studies.
  2. Aziz, Babar & Khan, Tasneem & Aziz, Shumaila, 2008. "Impact of Higher Education on Economic Growth of Pakistan," MPRA Paper 22912, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2008.
  3. Terance J. Rephann, 2007. "Community College Growth Opportunities: Untapped Potential in America’s Heartland?," Working Papers 2007-01, Center for Economic and Policy Studies.

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