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Social Costs of Jobs Lost Due to Environmental Regulations

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  • Timothy J. Bartik

    ()
    (W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research)

Abstract

This paper estimates the social costs of job loss due to environmental regulation. Per job lost, potential social costs of job loss are high, plausibly over $100,000 in present value costs (2012 dollars) per permanently lost job. However, these social costs will typically be far less than the earnings associated with lost jobs, because labor markets and workers adjust, increased leisure has some value, and employers benefit from wage reductions. A plausible range for social costs is 8 - 32 percent of the associated earnings of the lost jobs. Social costs will be higher for older workers, high-wage jobs, and in high unemployment conditions. Under plausible estimates of job loss for most environmental regulations, the social costs of job loss will typically be less than 10 percent of other measured social costs of regulations. Therefore, adding in job loss is unlikely to tip many regulatory benefit-cost analyses.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research in its series Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles with number 13-193.

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Date of creation: Mar 2013
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Handle: RePEc:upj:weupjo:13-193

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Keywords: Benefit cost analysis; worker displacement; environmental regulation; social cost of labor;

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  13. Helliwell, John & Huang, Haifang, 2011. "New measures of the costs of unemployment: Evidence from the subjective well-being of 2.3 million Americans," Working Papers 2011-3, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
  14. Pizer, William & Morgenstern, Richard & Shih, Jhih-Shyang, 1999. "Jobs Versus the Environment: An Industry-level Perspective," Discussion Papers, Resources For the Future dp-99-01-rev, Resources For the Future.
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Cited by:
  1. Timothy J. Bartik, 2014. "How Effects of Local Labor Demand Shocks Vary with Local Labor Market Conditions," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research 14-202, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

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