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Impact of Foreign Aid on Economic Growth in Sierra Leone: Empirical Analysis

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  • Kargbo, Philip Michael
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    Abstract

    This paper examines the impact of foreign aid on economic growth in Sierra Leone, a country where an empirical econometric study on aid effectiveness is yet to exist. Using a triangulation of approaches involving the ARDL bounds test approach and the Johansen maximum likelihood approach to cointegration for the period 1970-2007, we find that foreign aid has a significant contribution in promoting economic growth in the country. This finding is found to be robust across approaches and specifications. Whilst aid may have been associated with improvement in economic growth in the country, its impact during the period of war is found to be either weak or non-existent. Further, aid during the pre-war period is found to be marginally more effective than aid during the post-war period. The latter results suggest that the impact of aid may change with time.

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    File URL: http://www.wider.unu.edu/stc/repec/pdfs/wp2012/wp2012-007.pdf
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    Paper provided by World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) in its series Working Paper Series with number UNU-WIDER Research Paper WP2012/07.

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    Length: 44
    Date of creation: 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2012-07

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    Keywords: growth; foreign aid; cointegration; Sierra Leone; ARDL; post-war;

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    1. Hristos Doucouliagos & Martin Paldam, 2005. "Aid Effectiveness on Growth. A Meta Study," Economics Working Papers 2005-13, School of Economics and Management, University of Aarhus.
    2. Dollar, David & Levin, Victoria, 2005. "Sowing and reaping: institutional quality and project outcomes in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3524, The World Bank.
    3. Simon Feeny, 2005. "The Impact of Foreign Aid on Economic Growth in Papua New Guinea," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(6), pages 1092-1117.
    4. James McHugh & Theodora Kosma & Dimitri G. Demekas, 2002. "The Economics of Post Conflict Aid," IMF Working Papers 02/198, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Shrestha, Min B. & Chowdhury, Khorshed, 2005. "ARDL Modelling Approach to Testing the Financial Liberalisation Hypothesis," Economics Working Papers wp05-15, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
    6. Muhammad Javid & Abdul Qayyum, 2010. "Foreign aid-growth nexus in pakistan: role of macroeconomic policies," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(4), pages A31.
    7. Baliamoune-Lutz, Mina N. & Mavrotas, George, 2008. "Aid Effectiveness: Looking at the Aid-Social Capital-Growth Nexus," Working Paper Series RP2008/75, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Banerjee, Anindya & Dolado, Juan J. & Galbraith, John W. & Hendry, David, 1993. "Co-integration, Error Correction, and the Econometric Analysis of Non-Stationary Data," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198288107.
    9. Mark McGillivray & Simon Feeny & Niels Hermes & Robert Lensink, 2006. "Controversies over the impact of development aid: it works; it doesn't; it can, but that depends …," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(7), pages 1031-1050.
    10. Hansen, Henrik & Tarp, Finn, 2001. "Aid and growth regressions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 547-570, April.
    11. Inder, Brett, 1993. "Estimating long-run relationships in economics : A comparison of different approaches," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 57(1-3), pages 53-68.
    12. Bazoumana Ouattara, 2006. "Aid, debt and fiscal policies in Senegal," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(8), pages 1105-1122.
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