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Climate Change and Industrial Policy

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  • Naude, Wim

Abstract

This paper explores the implications of climate change for industrial policy (IP). Five implications are discussed, namely the need for international coordination of IPs; for putting human development, and not emission targets, as the overriding objective of low-carbon IP; of stimulating innovation for energy efficiency, energy diversification, and carbon capture and storage; and for aligning IP with trade policies. Finally the funding needs of low-carbon IPs are discussed, and the importance of private sector funding emphasized.

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File URL: http://www.wider.unu.edu/stc/repec/pdfs/wp2011/wp2011-077.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) in its series Working Paper Series with number UNU-WIDER Research Paper WP2011/77.

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Length: 22
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2011-77

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Keywords: climate change; sustainable development; industrialization; industrial policy; low-carbon growth;

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  1. Thomas C. Schelling, 2009. "International Coordination to Address the Climate Challenge," Innovations: Technology, Governance, Globalization, MIT Press, vol. 4(4), pages 13-21, October.
  2. Martin L. Weitzman, 2007. "A Review of the Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 45(3), pages 703-724, September.
  3. Maddison, David, 2003. "The amenity value of the climate: the household production function approach," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 155-175, May.
  4. Scott Barrett, 2009. "The Coming Global Climate-Technology Revolution," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(2), pages 53-75, Spring.
  5. William D. Nordhaus, 2007. "A Review of the Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 45(3), pages 686-702, September.
  6. Yan Dong & John Whalley, 2008. "Carbon, Trade Policy, And Carbon Free Trade Areas," Trade Working Papers 22730, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  7. Ojha, Vijay P., 2009. "Carbon emissions reduction strategies and poverty alleviation in India," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(03), pages 323-348, June.
  8. Gary Clyde Hufbauer & Steve Charnovitz & Jisun Kim, 2009. "Global Warming and the World Trading System," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 4280.
  9. Irfan ul Haque, 2007. "Rethinking Industrial Policy," UNCTAD Discussion Papers 183, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
  10. Plambeck, Erica L & Hope, Chris, 1996. "PAGE95 : An updated valuation of the impacts of global warming," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(9), pages 783-793, September.
  11. Urs Steiner Brandt & Gert Tinggaard Svendsen, 2003. "Fighting windmills? EU industrial interests and global climate negotiations," Working Papers 37/03, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Environmental and Business Economics.
  12. Richard Tol, 2002. "Estimates of the Damage Costs of Climate Change. Part 1: Benchmark Estimates," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 21(1), pages 47-73, January.
  13. Szirmai, Adam, 2009. "Industrialisation as an engine of growth in developing countries," MERIT Working Papers 010, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  14. Richard Tol, 2002. "Estimates of the Damage Costs of Climate Change, Part II. Dynamic Estimates," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 21(2), pages 135-160, February.
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