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How Does Colonial Origin Matter for Economic Performance in Sub-Saharan Africa?

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  • Julius A. Agbor

Abstract

This paper investigates some of the existing hypotheses regarding the transmission of different colonial legacies to modern day economic growth. The fact that different colonial strategies were pursued by different colonizers in various territories suggests possible ramifications for current development paths. This paper attempts to understand why economic growth performance is different even among African countries, where former British colonies appear to do marginally better. It focuses on two key channels of transmission, namely education and trade. Thirty-six sub-Saharan African countries during the period 1960–2000 are considered using Hausman-Taylor estimation techniquein an annualized panel data framework. In contrast with the methodology of previous studieswhere only the initial conditions at independence were held to influence the post-colonialgrowth path, this study attempts to distinguish the direct …/

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File URL: http://www.wider.unu.edu/stc/repec/pdfs/wp2011/wp2011-27.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) in its series Working Paper Series with number UNU-WIDER Working Paper WP2011/27.

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Length: 24 pages
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2011-27

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Keywords: colonial origin; education; institutions; Hausman-Taylor; sub-Saharan Africa;

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  1. Jacek Rostowski & Bogdan Stacescu, 2006. "The Wig and the Pith Helmet - the Impact of "Legal School" versus Colonial Institutions on Economic Performance (second version)," CASE Network Studies and Analyses, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research 0300, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
  2. T. W. Swan, 1956. "ECONOMIC GROWTH and CAPITAL ACCUMULATION," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 32(2), pages 334-361, November.
  3. Abhijit Banerjee & Lakshmi Iyer, 2010. "History Institutions and Economic Performance: The Legacy of Colonial Land Tenure Systems in India," Working Papers id:2811, eSocialSciences.
  4. Grier, Robin M, 1999. " Colonial Legacies and Economic Growth," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 98(3-4), pages 317-35, March.
  5. Gregory N. Price, 2003. "Economic Growth in a Cross-section of Nonindustrial Countries: Does Colonial Heritage Matter for Africa?," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(3), pages 478-495, 08.
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