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Childhood Mortality and Economic Growth

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  • Bhalotra, Sonia

Abstract

This paper investigates the extent to which the decline in childhood mortality over the last three decades can be attributed to economic growth. In doing this, it exploits the considerable variation in growth over this period, across states and over time. The analysis is able to condition upon a number of economic and demographic variables. The estimates are used to produce a crude estimate of the rate of economic growth that would be necessary to achieve the Millennium Development Goal of reducing the under-5 mortality by two thirds, from its level in 1990, by the year 2015. The main conclusion is that, while growth does have a significant impact on mortality risk, growth alone cannot be relied upon to achieve the goal.

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File URL: http://www.wider.unu.edu/stc/repec/pdfs/rp2006/rp2006-79.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) in its series Working Paper Series with number RP2006/79.

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Length: 24 pages
Date of creation: 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:rp2006-79

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Keywords: childhood mortality; economic growth; MDGs; India;

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References

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