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A More or Less Unequal World? World Income Distribution in the 20th Century

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  • Bob Sutcliffe
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    Abstract

    Statistical studies are hardly needed to prove the existence of immense material inequality between human beings. It is evident to anyone who walks down the street in most major cities or watches a television newscast which jumps from images of famine in Angola to the business or the football transfer news. This article takes the existence of great inequality as given but discusses the various ways in which that inequality can be and is measured and surveys evidence about how inequality on a world scale has evolved during the last century and especially since 1980.

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    File URL: http://www.peri.umass.edu/fileadmin/pdf/working_papers/working_papers_51-100/WP54.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst in its series Working Papers with number wp54.

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    Date of creation: 2002
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    Handle: RePEc:uma:periwp:wp54

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    1. Alan Heston & Robert E. Lipsey, 1999. "International and Interarea Comparisons of Income, Output, and Prices," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number hest99-1, May.
    2. Anthony B. Atkinson & Andrea Brandolini, 2000. "Promise and Pitfalls in the Use of 'Secondary' Data-Sets: Income Inequality in OECD Countries," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 379, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
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    Cited by:
    1. Branko Milanovic, 2005. "Global Income Inequality: What It Is And Why It Matters?," HEW 0512001, EconWPA.

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