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Long- and short-term portfolio choices of paintings

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Author Info

  • Renato G.Renato Flôres Jr.
  • Victor Ginsburgh
  • Philippe Jeanfils

Abstract

In their paper on price comovements of paintings, Ginsburgh and Jeanfils show that in three important markets (London, Paris and New York), prices of well-known and lesser known painters ''move together'' (are cointegrated). They conclude that therefore, an investor may be indifferent between the two groups of painters. We show that this is not the case, since well-known painters are less risky, and that though returns may be comparable, the share of well-known painters in a portfolio of paintings might be as high as 90%. We also construct long-run and short-run portfolios and show that these may be very different. These short-term portfolios give interesting insights which help in characterizing each of the three markets. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles in its series ULB Institutional Repository with number 2013/99275.

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Date of creation: 1999
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Publication status: Published in: Journal of cultural economics (1999) v.23 n° 3,p.193-210
Handle: RePEc:ulb:ulbeco:2013/99275

Note: SCOPUS: ar.j
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Related research

Keywords: Investment in art; Portfolio choices;

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References

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  1. Czujack, Corinna & Flôres Junior, Renato Galvão & Ginsburgh, Victor, 1995. "On Long-Run Price Comovements Between Paintings and Prints," Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 269, FGV/EPGE Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
  2. Ginsburgh, V. & Jeanfils, P., . "Long-term comovements in international markets for paintings," CORE Discussion Papers RP -1147, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  3. BUELENS, Nathalie & GINSBURGH, Victor, . "Revisiting Baumol's `art as floating crap game'," CORE Discussion Papers RP -1063, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  4. Olivier Chanel & Louis-André Gérard-Varet & Victor Ginsburgh, 1996. "The relevance of hedonic price indices," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 20(1), pages 1-24, March.
  5. Davidson, James E H, et al, 1978. "Econometric Modelling of the Aggregate Time-Series Relationship between Consumers' Expenditure and Income in the United Kingdom," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 88(352), pages 661-92, December.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Helen Higgs & Andrew C Worthington, 2004. "Financial returns and price determinants in the Australian art market, 1973-2003," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 184, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
  2. Andrew C. Worthington & Helen Higgs, 2003. "Risk, return and portfolio diversification in major painting markets: The application of conventional financial analysis to unconventional investments," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 148, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
  3. Richard J. Agnello, 2002. "Investment Returns and Risk for Art: Evidence from Auctions of American Paintings," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 28(4), pages 443-463, Fall.
  4. Andrew Worthington & Helen Higgs, 2006. "A Note on Financial Risk, Return and Asset Pricing in Australian Modern and Contemporary Art," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 73-84, March.
  5. Helen Higgs & Andrew Worthington, 2004. "Transmission of returns and volatility in art markets: a multivariate GARCH analysis," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(4), pages 217-222.
  6. Richard Agnello & Xiaowen Xu, 2006. "Art Prices and Race: Paintings by African American Artists and Their White Contemporaries," Working Papers 06-06, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
  7. Andrew C. Worthington & Helen Higgs, 2001. "Art as an Investment: Risk, Return and Comovements in Major Painting Markets," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 093, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
  8. Louis Lévy-Garboua & Claude Montmarquette, 2002. "The Demand for the Arts," CIRANO Working Papers 2002s-10, CIRANO.

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