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Sample Attrition in the Presence of Population Attrition

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  • Seik Kim
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Abstract

This paper develops a method that accounts for non-ignorable sample attrition in the presence of population attrition for use with a non-representative panel sample. The method is applied to obtain attrition-correcting weights for the native and immigrant samples in the matched Current Population Survey (CPS). Of the two samples, the immigrant sample suffers from sample attrition due to changes in residence as well as population attrition caused by selective return migration. When there is population attrition, the second period cross-section is not representative of the first period population. Therefore, the existing sample attrition-correcting method developed by Hirano, Imbens, Ridder, and Rubin (2001) and Bhattacharya (2008) cannot be applied. We resolve this problem by generating a counterfactual, but representative cross-section prior to applying their method. The counterfactual sample can be obtained by weighting the second period cross-section by one minus the probability of population attrition. We show that the sample attrition and the population attrition processes are separately identified. This is useful because samples usually do not indicate which missing observations are due to sample attrition and which are due to population attrition. The attrition-correcting weights, once obtained, can be used in various studies of immigration using the CPS.

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Paper provided by University of Washington, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number UWEC-2009-02.

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Handle: RePEc:udb:wpaper:uwec-2009-02

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  1. Güell, Maia & Hu, Luojia, 2003. "Estimating the Probability of Leaving Unemployment Using Uncompleted Spells from Repeated Cross-Section Data," CEPR Discussion Papers 3957, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Robert Warren & Jennifer Peck, 1980. "Foreign-Born Emigration From The United States: 1960 To 1970," Demography, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 71-84, February.
  3. Bernt Bratsberg & Erling Barth & Oddbjørn Raaum, 2006. "Local Unemployment and the Relative Wages of Immigrants: Evidence from the Current Population Surveys," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(2), pages 243-263, May.
  4. Keisuke Hirano & Guido W. Imbens & Geert Ridder & Donald B. Rebin, 1998. "Combining Panel Data Sets with Attrition and Refreshment Samples," NBER Technical Working Papers 0230, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Harriet Duleep & Mark Regets, 1997. "Measuring immigrant wage growth using matched CPS files," Demography, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 239-249, May.
  6. George J. Borjas & Bernt Bratsberg, 1994. "Who Leaves? The Outmigration of the Foreign-Born," NBER Working Papers 4913, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Bhattacharya, Debopam, 2008. "Inference in panel data models under attrition caused by unobservables," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 144(2), pages 430-446, June.
  8. Peracchi, Franco & Welch, Finis, 1995. "How representative are matched cross-sections? Evidence from the Current Population Survey," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 153-179, July.
  9. Ridder, Geert & Moffitt, Robert, 2007. "The Econometrics of Data Combination," Handbook of Econometrics, in: J.J. Heckman & E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 6, chapter 75 Elsevier.
  10. Guillermina Jasso & Mark Rosenzweig, 1982. "Estimating the emigration rates of legal immigrants using administrative and survey data: The 1971 cohort of immigrants to the United States," Demography, Springer, vol. 19(3), pages 279-290, August.
  11. Xiaohong Chen & Han Hong & Elie Tamer, 2005. "Measurement Error Models with Auxiliary Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(2), pages 343-366.
  12. Borjas, George J., 1999. "The economic analysis of immigration," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 28, pages 1697-1760 Elsevier.
  13. Thomas Lemieux, 2006. "Increasing Residual Wage Inequality: Composition Effects, Noisy Data, or Rising Demand for Skill?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(3), pages 461-498, June.
  14. Chunrong Ai & Xiaohong Chen, 2003. "Efficient Estimation of Models with Conditional Moment Restrictions Containing Unknown Functions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(6), pages 1795-1843, November.
  15. Seik Kim, . "Economic Assimilation of Foreign-Born Workers in the United States: An Overlapping Rotating Panel Analysis," Working Papers UWEC-2008-19, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
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Cited by:
  1. Mattoo, Aaditya & Neagu, Ileana Cristina & Özden, Çağlar, 2012. "Performance of skilled migrants in the U.S.: A dynamic approach," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 829-843.
  2. Seik Kim, . "Wage Mobility of Foreign-Born Workers in the United States," Working Papers UWEC-2009-16, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
  3. Neagu, Ileana Cristina, 2009. "Career placement of skilled migrants in the U.S. labor market : a dynamic approach," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4891, The World Bank.
  4. Seik Kim & Nalina Varanasi, . "Labor Supply of Married Women in Credit-Constrained Households: Theory and Evidence," Working Papers UWEC-2010-01, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
  5. Seik Kim, . "Economic Assimilation of Foreign-Born Workers in the United States: An Overlapping Rotating Panel Analysis," Working Papers UWEC-2008-19, University of Washington, Department of Economics.

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