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The Puzzle of 'Idle' Children: Neither in School nor performing Economic Activity: Evidence from six Countries

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  • M.Biggeri
  • L.Guarcello
  • S.Lyon
  • F.Rosati

Abstract

This paper presents a set of descriptive statistics on the observed group of children that neither attends school nor performs economic activity. Drawing on datasets from six countries, evidence is provided suggesting that children can be absent from both school and economic activity because they are needed to perform household chores, because of their health, or because they are unable to find work after having left school. But a large proportion of children not in school or economic activity does not fall into any of these categories. A simple theoretical model of household decisions concerning children's time allocations is presented in an attempt to account for this 'unexplained' portion of the group of children absent from school and economic activity.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme) in its series UCW Working Paper with number 5.

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Date of creation: Oct 2003
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Handle: RePEc:ucw:worpap:5

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Cited by:
  1. Dendir, Seife, 2013. "Children.s endowment, schooling, and work in Ethiopia," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  2. Bando, Rosangela & Lopez-Calva, Luis F. & Patrinos, Harry Anthony, 2005. "Child labor, school attendance, and indigenous households : evidence from Mexico," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3487, The World Bank.
  3. Francavilla, Francesca & Giannelli, Gianna Claudia, 2007. "The Relation between Child Labour and Mothers' Work: The Case of India," IZA Discussion Papers 3099, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Santosh Mehrotra & Mario Biggeri, 2010. "Children in home worker households in Pakistan and Indonesia," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 31(2), pages 208-231, May.
  5. Eric Edmonds, 2007. "Child Labor," Working Papers id:988, eSocialSciences.
  6. Kondylis, Florence & Manacorda, Marco, 2010. "School Proximity and Child Labor: Evidence from Rural Tanzania," CEPR Discussion Papers 7890, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Webbink, Ellen & Smits, Jeroen & de Jong, Eelke, 2012. "Hidden Child Labor: Determinants of Housework and Family Business Work of Children in 16 Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 631-642.
  8. Andrea Repetto, 2013. "Vulnerabilidad y Oportunidades: Los Jóvenes Inactivos en Chile," Working Papers wp_031, Adolfo Ibáñez University, School of Government.
  9. Jean-Pierre Lachaud, 2007. "Les déterminants de l'inactivité économique et de la non-scolarisation des enfants aux Comores et à Madagascar. Existe-t-il une courbe de Kuznets ?," Documents de travail 140, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
  10. L.Guarcello & B.Henschel & S.Lyon & F.Rosati & C. Valdivia, 2006. "Child Labour in the Latin America and Carribean Region: a Gender Based Analisys," UCW Working Paper 17, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
  11. Prashant Bharadwaj & Leah K. Lakdawala & Nicholas Li, 2013. "Perverse Consequences of Well Intentioned Regulation: Evidence from India's Child Labor Ban," NBER Working Papers 19602, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Rana Ejaz Ali Khan & Karamat Ali, 2005. "Economically Active Children and Home-care Children: How Much They Differ," Labor and Demography 0510013, EconWPA.
  13. Ucw, 2010. "Child labour: trends, challenges and policy responses. Joining forces against child labour," UCW Working Paper 49, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
  14. Ellen Webbink & Jeroen Smits & Eelke Jong, 2013. "Household and Context Determinants of Child Labor in 221 Districts of 18 Developing Countries," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 110(2), pages 819-836, January.
  15. Strulik, Holger, 2010. "School Attendance and Child Labor - A Model of Collective Behavior," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-441, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
  16. Francesca Francavilla & Gianna Claudia Giannelli, 2010. "The relation between child work and the employment of mothers in India," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 31(2), pages 232-257, May.
  17. Ariane Utomo & Anna Reimondos & Iwu Utomo & Peter McDonald & Terence H. Hull, 2014. "What happens after you drop out? Transition to adulthood among early school-leavers in urban Indonesia," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(41), pages 1189-1218, April.

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