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Impact of Working Time on Children’s Health

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  • L.Guarcello
  • S.Lyon
  • F.Rosati

Abstract

This paper looks in detail at the relationship between the intensity of children's work (i.e., children's weekly working hours) and children's health outcomes, making use of household survey data from Bangladesh, Brazil, and Cambodia. The paper focuses only on the subset of children at work in economic activity. It relies on two sets of measures: self-reported health problems and injuries.The analysis points to a causal relationship between working hours and children's health outcomes.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme) in its series UCW Working Paper with number 12.

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Date of creation: Sep 2004
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Handle: RePEc:ucw:worpap:12

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References

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  1. Ravallion, Martin & Wodon, Quentin, 1999. "Does child labor displace schooling? - evidence on behavioral responses to an enrollment subsidy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2116, The World Bank.
  2. Barrera, Albino, 1990. "The role of maternal schooling and its interaction with public health programs in child health production," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 69-91, January.
  3. Heady, Christopher, 2003. "The Effect of Child Labor on Learning Achievement," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 385-398, February.
  4. Lisa A. Cameron, 2001. "The Impact of the Indonesian Financial Crisis on Children: An analysis using the 100 villages data," Innocenti Working Papers inwopa01/10, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre.
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Cited by:
  1. Salma Ahmed, 2011. "Trade-off between Child Labour and Schooling in Bangladesh: Role of Parental Education," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series 21-11, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  2. L.Guarcello & B.Henschel & S.Lyon & F.Rosati & C. Valdivia, 2006. "Child Labour in the Latin America and Carribean Region: a Gender Based Analisys," UCW Working Paper 17, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
  3. Ucw, 2009. "Comprendre le travail des enfants au Mali," UCW Country Studies 13, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
  4. Ucw, 2010. "Comprendre le travail des enfants et l’emploi des jeunes au Sénégal," UCW Country Studies 14, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).

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