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Class Size Effects: Evidence Using a New Estimation Technique

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Author Info

  • Kevin Denny

    (University College Dublin)

  • Veruska Oppedisano

    (University College London)

Abstract

This paper estimates the marginal effect of class size on educational attainment of high school students. We control for the potential endogeneity of class size in two ways using a conventional instrumental variable approach, based on changes in cohort size, and an alternative method where identification is based on restriction on higher moments. The data is drawn from the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) collected in 2003 for the United States and the United Kingdom. Using either method or the two in conjunction leads to the conclusion that increases in class size lead to improvements in student’s mathematics scores. Only the results for the United Kingdom are statistically significant.

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File URL: http://www.ucd.ie/t4cms/wp10_39.pdf
File Function: First version, 2010
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by School Of Economics, University College Dublin in its series Working Papers with number 201039.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: 09 Dec 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ucn:wpaper:201039

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Keywords: class sizes; educational production;

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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Class Sizes Revisited: Denny and Oppedisano
    by Liam Delaney in The Irish Economy on 2010-12-07 22:29:20
  2. New evidence on class size effects
    by Kevin Denny in Geary Behaviour Centre on 2010-12-07 13:58:00
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Cited by:
  1. Vinod Mishra & Russell Smyth, 2012. "It Pays to Be Happy (If You are a Man): Subjective Wellbeing and the Gender Wage Gap in Urban China," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series 51-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  2. Vinod Mishra & Russell Smyth, 2012. "Are More Senior Academics Really More Research Productive than Junior Academics? Evidence from Australian Law Schools," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series 47-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  3. Stephen Gibbons & Sandra McNally, 2013. "The Effects of Resources Across School Phases: A Summary of Recent Evidence," CEP Discussion Papers dp1226, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  4. Vinod Mishra & Russell Smyth, 2012. "Returns to Schooling in Urban China: New Evidence Using Heteroskedasticity Restrictions to Obtain Identification Without Exclusion Restrictions," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series 33-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.

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